Tag Archives: Dean Heller

Swiping Away Toward the Next Debacle?

banker 2 The Las Vegas Sun reports that residents of the Las Vegas metropolitan area have run up $3.88 billion – yes, that’s billion with a B – in credit card debt as of June 2014.  The residents are not alone. There’s more credit card indebtedness piling up in Texas.  The Dallas Morning News lists the increases in credit card debt for Houston is up 5.45%, for Dallas-Fort Worth up 4.70%, and just for good measure there are other increases around the country.  Orlando’s credit card debt is up 4.89%, Atlanta up 4.21%, Tampa-St. Petersburg up 3.75%.   There’s good and bad news here.

Remember the mantra in this blog? One man’s debt is another man’s asset?

Somewhere, somehow, in the maw of the Wall Street financial institutions, those accounts receivable are being sliced, and diced, and traded.  They are being securitized.  They are becoming Asset Based Securities.  Read bonds. They are being priced and sold.  And, of course, someone is making a tidy profit. Synchrony, the largest issuer of private label credit cards for large retailers in the United States,  recently earned a Morningstar rating of BBB for its new issue.  Profits are good news, if the products being transferred are valued properly.  If not, then we have the 2007-2008 Mortgage Meltdown Debacle Redux.

The replication of that debacle will be a bit more difficult if the Security and Exchange Commission succeeds in enforcing rules under the 2010 Dodd Frank Act. The rules now call for firms issuing the securities to file reports with the SEC on the underlying loan data, including credit scores and debt levels.  The SEC plans on providing potential investors with debt to income ratio information and metrics which would help with the assessment of loan/credit quality.  [WSJ]

We should possibly recall at this point that both the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute have called for the repeal of most, if not all, the provisions of the Dodd Frank Act.  The ultra-conservative think tanks have already declared the Act an imposition of unreasonable regulatory burdens on financial institutions.  [AEI]  It should also be remembered that Nevada Senator Dean Heller has called for the repeal of the Dodd Frank Act and its attendant regulations. [NVProg]

It’s also within recent memory that then-Representative Heller voted against the House version of the Dodd Frank bill on December 10 and  11, 2009 when Representatives Berkley and Titus voted in favor of it.  [govtrack]  Then on the final vote, December 11, 2009 Heller voted against the measure as one of 176 Republicans to do so. [govtrack]

When the conference report came back with the changes made to the bill from the Senate, once again Heller voted against it, on June 30, 2010. [govtrack] Heller also voted against H.R. 4173 (111th) on the conference report. [govtrack]  Four “nay” votes certainly should indicate that Heller was not in favor of financial regulatory reform.

Once in the Senate, Senator Heller teamed with Senator Jim DeMint (R-SC) to fully repeal the Dodd Frank Act in 2011. [DB]  And, lest he be considered inconsistent —  Senator Heller has now signed on as a cosponsor of Senator Bob Corker’s (R-TN) bill (S. 1217) which would make the FMIC (Federal Mortgage Insurance Corp) an independent agency of the federal government – read: Out from under the provisions of Dodd Frank.

For the record, there are eight bills in the House and Senate which provide for the repeal or diminishment of the financial regulation reforms included in the Dodd Frank Act. [govtrack]  Among these bills are those  sponsored by (H.R. 5016) Rep. Ander Crenshaw (R-FL), (H.R. 4564) Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC), (H.R. 4304) Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA), (H.R> 3193) Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI), and in the Senate, S. 1861, sponsored by Senator John Cornyn (R-TX). [govtrack]

The efforts by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to implement and enforce financial regulatory reform measures remain under a steady assault of lobbying interests, banking associations, wealth managers, and their allies in the U.S. Congress.  Senator Heller is certainly among this legion.

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Filed under Economy, financial regulation, Heller, Nevada economy

A New Effort Demonstrates The Need For More

Domestic ViolenceIn the midst of all the current turmoil and related teeth gnashing ranting and railing associated therewith, it’s nice to find some heroes.  A UCC church in Las Vegas makes the news today with its plan to assist victims of domestic violence, regardless of their gender, race, or creed. [LVSun] Granted domestic violence is mostly associated with protecting women from abusive spouses, but that doesn’t mean it’s restricted to that category.  So, a large round of applause to the little church trying to make a difference in this problematic issue:

“A 2010 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that bisexual and lesbian women were more likely to experience domestic violence than heterosexual women, and bisexual men were more likely to experience sexual violence than heterosexual men and gay men, who have similar rates.” [LVSun]

All the better since the re-authorization of VAWA in 2013 which finally recognized there might be a problem for members of the LBGT community and for members of Native American tribes.  To their credit, both Nevada Senators Reid and Heller voted in favor of the measure [GovTrak].  The final vote in the House showed all four members of Congress from Nevada voting in favor of the bill. [GovTrak] The measure passed on a 286-138 vote, all the nays coming from the Republican side of the aisle.

As described in a Department of Justice release, the re-authorization of VAWA addressed a serious problem in this country, and the inclusion of provisions for Native Americans was long overdue:

“In 2010, U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced an estimated 20 million violent and property victimizations, according to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). (NCJ 235508) These criminal victimizations included an estimated 4.3 million violent crimes defined as rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault. Almost 126,000 of the 1.4 million serious violent crimes were rapes and assaults. While this number has decreased over the last few years it is still shows that too many women are endangered and suffering. [...] American Indians are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault crimes compared to all other races, and one in three Indian women reports having been raped during her lifetime.” [DoJ]

The Department of Justice was correct in reporting the disparity in the statistics regarding the physical abuse experienced by Native American women.  Some of the numbers are patently outrageous.

 In a 2008 CDC study, 39% of Native women surveyed identified as victims of intimate partner violence in their lifetime, a rate higher than any other race or ethnicity surveyed. This finding has been common over the years. A study from 1998 that utilized a large national probability sample (n=8000) found that American Indian/Alaskan Native American women were the most likely racial group to report a physical assault by an intimate partner. [FWV.org pdf]

And: ” According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs at least 70% of the violent victimizations experienced by American
Indians are committed by persons not of the same race— a substantially higher rate of interracial violence than experienced by white or black victims.” [FWV.org pdf]

One of the issues for Native American women in Nevada is distance. There are domestic shelters in all major Nevada towns and cities, but some of these are at no small  physical distance from reservations.  The rural fishbowl effect creates another dilemma.  If a shelter is located in the immediate vicinity everyone knows of it — just as they know about every other thing that happens. If the shelter is located far enough away to secure some anonymity the victim may not have the transportation options available to get there.

In the best of all worlds, we would consider ways to alleviate the need for shelters for victims of domestic violence, urban or rural.

While some of the lists vary, most sources focus on the following elements of spousal abuse behavior.   A 1998 study reported by the NCBI observed:

“The present study compared male spouse abusers, with and without alcohol problems, with age-matched, nonabusive males on measures of personality style, personality disorder, dysphoria, and a number of demographic measures. There were no differences among the groups in racial composition, religious preference, or religious devoutness. Male abusers were less likely to be employed, to be in intact relationships, and were less well educated. They were more likely to have witnessed abuse or experienced abuse as children, although that observation is more characteristic of abusers with alcohol problems. Measures of personality and psychopathology generally supported the hypothesis that abusive males would show greater elevations on test scales reflecting personality disorder and dysphoria and less conformity than nonbatterers. Alcohol abuse was related to greater batterer-nonbatterer differences.”

Translation: Batterers come in all races, creeds, and kinds. They are generally unhappy people, less likely to have steady employment, and more likely to be repeating abuse they witnessed as children.

The batterers tend to try to excuse their behavior — the drinks made me do it defense — and often try to deny that the behavior has any lasting effect on family or personal relationships.  Three other terms associated with battering are possessiveness, jealousy, and domination. [NCCAVA]  The use of violence is a learned behavior, a repetition of childhood scenes, or the continuation of behavior which is not confronted, curtailed, or contained.  Battering is also associated with overall low self esteem and poor communication or interpersonal skills. [NCCAVA]

If this sounds like a mental health issue … it’s because it is.  And, this is not territory in which the state of Nevada has exactly covered itself in glory.  FY 2010’s $184 million sounds like a large figure until it’s broken down per capita and the allocation was  41st in the nation with $68.32 allocated. [GovSL]  The national average per capita expenditure in 2009 was $122.90. [NAMI] The NAMI looked at state budget appropriations by state from FY 2009 to FY 2012 and reported Nevada’s proposed expenditures declined 28.1%, down from $175.5 million to $126.2 million. [NAMI] These reductions put Nevada back at the top of the list for budget cutting of mental health services, along with South Carolina and Alabama. [NAMI]

Unfortunately, in an Age of Austerity, in which public allocation of tax revenues are perceived as expenses rather than investments, there is less incentive to be “the best.” Doing just enough to get by appears preferable? If Nevada would like to be known as the state with the least need for domestic violence shelters — for anyone and everyone — then some soul searching is in order.

Have we equipped and staffed our public schools with the resources to identify, diagnose, and treat children who are in households experiencing domestic violence?  Have we required that private school counterparts do the same?

Have we allocated the necessary resources to help schools, local governments, tribes, and community organizations provide assistance to families in which domestic violence occurs?  Can we offer these entities coordinated programs to promote education, address bullying behaviors, decrease instances of domestic violence?

Have we done enough to provide jobs for those who find their economic circumstances so stressful that violent behavior comes from their lack of personal control as they cope, or not, with the frustration?

The victims of domestic violence, Native American, non-Native, members of the LBGT community, or straight, men and boys, and women and girls, shouldn’t have to wait until that mythical day upon which the magic of trickle down hoax economics kicks in and all will be right with the world.  These men, women, girls, boys, need assistance now — and not in some utopian ethereal world yet to come.

Our Thanks to the members of that Las Vegas UCC church for making life a little bit easier for more people to receive more support.

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Heller Helps Sustain Another GOP Filibuster

Heller 3What if there were a bill in Congress which would do the following?

“Amends the Internal Revenue Code to: (1) grant business taxpayers a tax credit for up to 20% of insourcing expenses incurred for eliminating a business located outside the United States and  relocating it within the United States, and (2) deny a tax deduction for outsourcing expenses incurred in relocating a U.S. business outside the United States. Requires an increase in the taxpayer’s employment of full-time employees in the United States in order to claim the tax credit for insourcing expenses.”

In short — offer corporations tax incentives to bring American jobs back to America, or S. 2569.

But then, there’s the GOP side of the aisle saying things like:

“Some Republicans argue that if Democrats truly wanted to keep companies in the United States, they would work with Republicans to overhaul the tax code and reduce corporate tax rates.“It’s a bill that’s designed for campaign rhetoric and failure — not to create jobs here in the U.S.,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Tuesday. “Everyone knows that the Democrats aren’t being serious here.” [The Hill]

First, Senator McConnell’s taunt, that the bill is a purely political exercise without any redeeming merit, is simply a legislative version of the Ad Hominem Attack — name calling without addressing the issue at hand. Secondly, Senator McConnell’s definition of “working with” all too often means give us everything we want and we’ll still keep filibustering a measure.  To wit: The bill to require background checks and close the gun show loophole, in which the total gun safety legislative package was pared down to a single issue to appease the GOP and then the GOP filibustered the bill anyway.  Or the Affordable Care Act, originally a Heritage Foundation proposal, which after numerous amendments to assuage the concerns of Senate Republicans received no support from that quarter.

Third, there’s the matter of “working with Republicans to overhaul the tax code,” which assumes that the Republicans have a plan to overhaul the tax code.  The latest GOP tax proposal comes from the House, and would cut the top tax rate from 39.6% to 25%, impose a surtax on some  incomes above $450,000, but leave capital gains taxes at the low rate, to the benefit of hedge fund and wealth management firms. [WaPo] However, the problem with Representative Camp’s proposal is one shared with other GOP plans (health plans, budgets) – the devils haven’t been specified in the details.

The Joint Committee on Taxation analysis indicates the ‘plan’ doesn’t specify the special interest tax breaks which litter the IRS regulations will get the axe in order to make up for revenue lost in the bracket reductions.   The Camp proposal also comes with its own set of complexities, summarized in the Tax Policy Center’s analysis.  To mention just one, there’s the resurrected specter of the Alternative Minimum Tax implicit in Camp’s legislation — nothing like taking up something complicated in order to make another thing simple?

Then there’s some bad news for states, such as Nevada, which do not have a state income tax:

“Camp would repeal the deductibility of state and local taxes, including both property taxes and income taxes. He’d abolish tax-exempt private activity bonds. And he’d impose a 10 percent surtax on municipal bond interest for high-income households, a step likely to raise the cost of issuing state and local debt.But Camp’s plan also includes some less obvious changes that could increase state income tax revenues, especially for states that piggyback on the federal income tax. By limiting deductions—and thus boosting taxable income—Camp’s plan could also increase state income tax revenue, just as the Tax Reform Act of 1986 did.”  [Tax Policy Center]

No matter, the local and state income taxes, which Nevada doesn’t have, would no longer be deductible, but unless there is a state income tax on which to “piggy back” state income tax revenue doesn’t increase under the provisions of Camp’s bill.  Thus we lose the property tax deductions, and gain very little else.

Then there’s the matter of reducing the corporate tax rate. To what? There’s the statutory rate, which Republicans are fond of citing, and then there’s what taxes cost the corporations — or, the effective tax rate.  The GAO reported the effective tax rate for U.S. corporations at 12.6%.  [CNN]  Of course, the GOP response is “ya’shouldn’t hafta get a lawyer to figure out your taxes,” but that’s precisely what major corporations DO. And, they do it with a raft load of tax attorneys.  It doesn’t seem too far out of line to suggest that if the statutory rate were to be reduced to X%, the rafts of tax attorneys would be hard at work seeing how the liability might be reduced to X-Y%.

And while we’re on the subject of complicated tax codes — it does appear a bit unseemly to have the self same initiators and  protectors of tax break loopholes for corporations advance arguments that the tax code is “broken” because it is so complicated.  This would be a good time to click on over to Jon Stewart’s classic rant on tax avoiding corporations, “The Inversions of the Body Snatchers.”

However, speaking of tax breaks for corporations which bring jobs back to American shores… We aren’t going to see those because the Republicans in the U.S. Senate are successfully filibustering S. 2569, and kept their filibuster going in a vote on July 30, 2014 at 10:50 AM. The cloture motion failed on a 54-42 vote, with Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) voting along with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) to further stall the Bring the Jobs Back Bill.

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Heller Rides (His Hobby Horse) Again

Hobby HorseThe U.S. Senate voted Tuesday evening on a cloture motion to stop the Republican filibuster of H.R. 4660, (Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 ) and the cloture motion was agreed to on a 95-3 vote.  The three Republicans voting to sustain the filibuster?  Paul (R-KY), Lee (R-UT), and Nevada’s own Dean Heller (R-NV). [roll call 200]

And, why might he have done this? Perhaps we have the answer in the following statement posted to Senator Heller’s web site:

“U.S. Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) has filed “No Budget, No Pay” as an amendment to the CJS Appropriations Bill (H.R. 4660).  The Heller No Budget, No Pay Amendment calls on Congress to adopt legislation requiring passage of a yearly budget and all twelve appropriations bills each fiscal year in order to receive pay.”

This particular hobby horse is a favorite toy for the Senator.   However,  proposal comes with a bit of a problem for the Constitution First Crowd — it’s unconstitutional.  See the 27th Amendment: “No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.”   And, while the proposition has a lovely tinkly sound for fiscal conservatives it is no more grounded in reality than Tinker Bell.

In an article speaking for the ethereal proposal, former Comptroller General David Walker inadvertently included the core of the problem for the No Labels folk: “Congress has only passed spending bills on time four times since 1952. The last time Congress passed both a concurrent budget resolution and all required spending bills on time was 1996.” [Politico]  And, there’s another historical problem:

“In four of the last five election years in which the Republicans held at least partial control of Congress (1998, 2002, 2004 and 2006), they didn’t pass a budget resolution. That includes three years in which Republicans controlled both chambers.” [WaPo 2012]

There’s some irony in a Republican proposal to “solve” a problem created by … Republicans.  What might we call an unconstitutional, ahistorical, and flimsy proposal which is full of “sound and fury signifying nothing?”  The usual label is Grandstanding.

The idea has a lovely ring on the hustings, makes for great sound bite fodder, but as evidenced by the underwhelming support received by Senator Heller during vote #200, it has about Zilch chance of passage.

 

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Heller and the ALEC by the back door minimum wage issue

Heller 2Yesterday’s post concerned Senator Dean Heller’s (R-NV) decision to support the Republican filibuster of an increase in the federal minimum wage, focusing primarily on the economic effects and the number of Nevada workers who might be immediately affected.  However, there was a second element to Senator Heller’s objection to the measure — that the states should be the ones to raise the minimum wage levels in their jurisdictions.   As if they would?

What might prevent a state from opting to increase the minimum wage?  ALEC.

The American Legislative Exchange Council is actively working toward the goal of enacting legislation reducing minimum wages and overtime pay, or stopping localities from doing the same:

“Since 2011, politicians backed by the American Legislative Exchange Council, which has hit the headlines for previous campaigns on voting rights and gun laws, have introduced 67 different laws in 25 different states on the issue.

The proposed laws are generally aimed at reducing minimum wage levels, weakening overtime protection or stopping the local creation of minimum wage laws in cities or states. Using language similar to “model bill” templates drafted by Alec, they were put forward by local politicians who are almost always Republican and affiliated with the powerful conservative group.” [TRS] (emphasis added)

Eleven of those bits of “model legislation” eventually became law, including in New Hampshire, Arizona, and Idaho.  For state legislators not inclined to do their own drafting, ALEC has conveniently provided a piece of fill-in-the-blank model legislation (pdf) for them.  In fact, according to the National Employment Law Project, ALEC is steadfastly opposed to  (1) minimum wage laws, (2) living wage legislation, (3) minimum wage laws for starting workers, (4) increases in overtime pay.  There is model legislation to preempt state efforts in all these areas. [NELP pdf]

However Jeffersonian Senator Heller may wish to sound about “state’s rights,” the design should be reasonably clear — conservative forces backed by deep pocketed corporate sponsors want to eliminate minimum wage legislation, prevent living wage bills, and preempt state and local efforts to enact protections for working people.  So, from the bully pulpit inside the Beltway, Senator Heller is free to pontificate about the desirability of state leadership in this economic realm BUT the practical effect is to toss the issue back into the state legislatures wherein ALEC can work its magic.

Nothing would please the Austerians more than to play the divide and conquer game — happily believing that lower labor costs will entice enterprises into low wage regions.   If, for example, Nevada were to eliminate its minimum wage, then in combination with other states with such draconian statutes, that would create pressure on other states to do likewise in order to be ‘competitive.’  We know this to be a pie in the sky solution because factors like transportation, infrastructure, work force experience and training, and resource availability are essential in the business location formula.  However, it does create the mixture necessary for a race to the bottom in wages and benefits. Just the sort of thing to make corporate revenues whistle and sing to the analysts.

The second problem with this plan is that while labor costs may be a major factor in manufacturing, they are not as crucial in other economic sectors.  We’ve looked at two types of retail operations before (restaurant and grocery); the important element for these small businesses is speed of service.  Long waits and long lines do not profitability make.   The more labor intensive the enterprise the more labor costs will be a factor, and this is illustrated by looking at the labor costs as a percentage of revenue for sole proprietorships, those little businesses the GOP purports to champion.)

The percentage for food service and bars is 36.74%, for agriculture 37.60%, for construction 53.64%, for health care 77.74%, for manufacturing 38.15%, for retailing 19.40%.  [BizStats]  We can drill down into the retail sector and find that the percentages are 20.43% for clothing stores, 13.66% for food and beverage establishments, and 6.48% for gas stations.   Indeed, for all those little sole proprietorship Mom and Pop stores to whom the Republicans appeal for support — the highest percentage never goes above 35%. [BizStats]

If we draw back and look at a large picture of productivity and worker compensation there’s not much to support Senator Heller’s apparent inclination to race to the bottom there either.

Labor productivity, as defined by output per hour, increased in 63% of the 52 service related and mining industries according to a BLS Study (pdf) using 2011 figures.  “Unit labor costs fell in 11 of 47 service providing industries Unit labor costs declined more frequently in industries where productivity rose, as productivity gains offset movements in hourly compensation.” [BLS pdf]

If productivity is increasing and unit labor costs are decreasing, then why would Senator Heller and his allies in ALEC want to eliminate minimum wage laws and prevent living wage legislation?

Let’s hazard the guess that the impetus to get even more productivity (more work per hour) at even less cost has everything in the world to do with Wall Street and not a heck of a lot to do with Main Street.

Nothing so delights the financial markets as the prospect of creating more “shareholder value” by reducing the inputs — reduced costs for materials, reduced costs for fixed assets, reduced costs for depreciation, reduced costs for employee (read: worker not CEO) compensation.  As the lady once said of the turtles:  It’s earnings reports, earnings reports, earnings reports, all the way down to the bottom.  [CarnegieScience]

And there we have it. It’s workers — racing all the way to the bottom, with no federal minimum wage to underpin their economic security — it’s American workers being told that if their counterparts in China are willing to work for $1.74 per hour then they are being “overpaid” here.  And — with Senator Heller’s state’s rights excuse greasing the downward ramp.

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Heller: 0.01% trumps Nevada’s 15%

Heller 2As of 2012 there were some 161,317 workers in the state of Nevada who would be directly affected by an increase in the minimum wage, out of a total workforce of approximately 1.068,842.  Of the 161,317 directly affected 139,064 were aged 20 or above.  [EPI pdf] A bit of punching on the plastic brains (read calculator) shows that 15.1% of Nevada’s workforce would be directly affected, and that 86.2% of these workers were NOT teenagers.

So, why would Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) vote to sustain the Republican filibuster of the minimum wage increase bill in the U.S. Senate? [Senate]

Senator Heller offered two explanations: (1) “Heller’s vote was rooted in his belief the minimum wage should be determined by individual states and not the federal government, “and this particular legislation is no exception,” according to his spokeswoman Chandler Smith.” [LVRJ] (2) “Smith added Heller was persuaded by a Congressional Budget Office estimate that the legislation “could cost our economy 500,000 jobs.” [LVRJ]

Let’s take the second part first — Senator Heller seems to have read one half of the report, or one half of the CBO’s conclusions.  The conclusions created a “mixed message:”  A popular Democratic proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, championed by President Obama, could reduce total employment by 500,000 workers by the second half of 2016. But it would also lift 900,000 families out of poverty and increase the incomes of 16.5 million low-wage workers in an average week.” [NYT]

Evidently, it doesn’t take too much precision to convince Senator Heller to embrace half a report.  He missed the part wherein there were two options ($9.00 and $10.10) and he obviously missed this portion of the text:

In CBO’s assessment, there is a two-thirds chance that the effect of the $9.00 option would be in the range between a very slight increase in the number of jobs and a loss of 200,000 jobs. If employment increased under either option, in CBO’s judgment, it would probably be because increased demand for goods and services (resulting from the shift of income from higher-income to lower-income people) had boosted economic activity and generated more jobs than were lost as a direct result of the increase in the cost of hiring low-wage workers. [CBO pdf]

There’s our old friend “aggregate demand” again, if more workers have more money there will be more demand for goods and services and hence more employment.  Unfortunately, Senator Heller is still locked into his mantra “less regulation, more tax cuts (especially for the 0.01%), “rein in government spending” (unless that means loopholes for corporations), and supporting comprehensive energy policies (read: support the oil and gas giants and the Canadian XL Pipeline).” [Heller]  None of this is substantiated by the conclusion reached in the February 18, 2014 version of the report issued by the CBO. Nor is the conclusion all that solid.

“Once fully implemented in the second half of 2016, the $10.10 option would reduce total employment by about 500,000 workers, or 0.3 percent, CBO projects (see the table below). As with any such estimates, however, the actual losses could be smaller or larger; in CBO’s assessment, there is about a two-thirds chance that the effect would be in the range between a very slight reduction in employment and a reduction in employment of 1.0 million workers.”

With all due respect to those who toil diligently at the CBO to provide economic analysis, a conclusion that there is a 66% chance of a range of employment displacement from “very slight” to 1 million isn’t all that robust.   However, this seems sufficient to support Senator Heller’s proclivity for hugging his favorite talking points.

At the risk of over-simplifying his position, the core of it is essentially Trickle Down Hoaxsterism with Austerity for All and Prosperity for A Few.   Somehow we are to believe that cutting taxes (especially for the 0.01%) and deregulating Wall Street will “create jobs” … sometime…somewhere.  Meanwhile, social safety net programs are subsidizing the poverty level wages being paid by major corporations. [HuffPo]

Meanwhile back in the real world, and in the state of Nevada — of those 161,317 workers directly affected by an increase in the minimum wage increase 68,247 are non-Hispanic whites, another 54,572 are Hispanic, and 12,957 are African American.  [EPI pdf]

As to the argument that minimum wage jobs tend to be part time, the EPI statistics don’t support that myth either — 81,115 are full time employees.  56,971 are mid-time employment, i.e. from 20 to 34 hours per week, and only 23,230 are actually part time jobs with 20 hours per week or less.    Nor are the people working a minimum wage jobs necessarily “drop outs” — 64,606 are high school graduates, 40,187 have some college or post secondary education, 5,824 have an associate’s degree, 12,051 have bachelor-level degrees; leaving 38,639 with less than a high school diploma or its equivalent.  [EPI pdf]

The notion that when speaking of minimum wage workers we’re talking about teens, females, and drop outs isn’t sustained by the actual numbers, in fact, while there are more Nevada women holding down minimum wage jobs (83,079) there are 78,238 men trying to maintain life on the minimum wage in Nevada. [EPI pdf]

We might summarize by concluding that Senator Heller would far rather support further tax cuts for the 0.01%, and more deregulation of the Wall Street Casino, and yet more “austerity” for those who work for corporations paying below living wages, than he would care to support legislation to support at least 15% of Nevada’s working men and women.

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Backpedaling In the Brush: Heller, Bundy, and the Radical Right

BundyOh my, there is something to be said for not jumping on the Fox Faux News bandwagon in seemingly opportune moments — and Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) may be feeling a bit of that now?  [NVP]

Only days ago Senator Heller was calling Cliven Bundy and his Brigands “patriots.” [Roll Call]  Senator Reid’s commentary on this latest manifestation of the radical right (domestic terrorists) was “too broad a brush” for Senator Heller who was concerned about federal lands in Nevada and the proportionality of BLM operations.

And then Mr. Bundy started talking…..

He talked about people (read African Americans) in North Las Vegas. He talked about people sitting on porches with nothing to do. He talked about people getting government subsidies instead of picking cotton.  He talked about how “maybe they were better off” in those good old days…. [NYTUpdate: The Rachel Maddow Show provided context for Mr. Bundy’s remarks which explains the radical racism forthcoming from the “sovereign citizen” rancher.  (video)

Senator Heller moved quickly from characterizing Mr. Bundy and his cohorts as “Boy Scouts and Grandmothers,” to back pedaling as fast as he could: ” Chandler Smith, a spokesman for Mr. Heller, said that the senator “completely disagrees with Mr. Bundy’s appalling and racist statements, and condemns them in the most strenuous way.” [NYT]

The Nevada Democratic Party reacted swiftly, and noted that Senator Heller wasn’t the only Nevada Republican to associate him or herself with the Bundy Cause Celebre:

“These comments are reprehensible, and every Republican politician in the state of Nevada who tried to latch on to Cliven Bundy’s newfound celebrity with TEA Partiers and the militia movement should be ashamed of their actions.  If Dean Heller, Cresent Hardy, Niger Innis, Michelle Fiore, Adam Laxalt and every other Republican politician who tried to attach themselves to this man seemed desperate a week ago, now they look downright pathetic.  Every Republican elected official who risked inciting violence to gain political capital out of Cliven Bundy now owes the people of Nevada an apology for their irresponsible behavior of putting their own political future ahead of the safety of Nevadans.”

There were others.  There was Assemblyman Jim Wheeler (R-Douglas), and Senator Don Gustavson (R-NV14, Humboldt, Lander, Mineral, Pershing, Nye [part], and Washoe [part]) and Assemblyman John Ellison (R-NV33, Elko, Eureka, White Pine, Eureka) and Assemblyman Ira Hansen (R-NV32, Humboldt, Pershing, Lander, Mineral, Esmeralda, Washoe [part]) joining in the call for “a probe of the armed incursion” by the Bureau of Land Management, along with Assemblywoman Michele Fiore (R-NV4) [Ralston]

Why would anyone be particularly shocked that Cliven Bundy would receive accolades and support from any of these self identified and self described conservative Republicans?

Assemblyman Wheeler earned some notoriety last October when he told a Story County GOP crowd he’d ‘hold his nose and vote for slavery if that’s what his constituents wanted.’ [LVSun]  Which is probably why we generally don’t want the majority voting on minority rights.

Senator Gustavson happily signed onto the “10-4″ pledge as a member of the 10th’ers. “I have always been a strong supporter of the 10th Amendment and the Constitution itself including all of the “Bill of Rights”. I was a co-sponsor to AJR 15, (Claims sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution) during the 2009 Session of the Nevada Legislature. It is time for Americans and the States to take back their constitutional rights!

Assemblyman Ellison is the Hero of the Battle of Bunkerville, to some, — “If the(re) was a hero in the Bundy Ranch standoff it was Nevada Assemblyman John Ellison who when most other Nevada political leaders were heading as far away from the range war as possible, Ellison charged in and just may have prevented the standoff from exploding.” [CTV]  Assemblyman Ellison might have wanted to join the more cautious members of his party and distance himself from the racists and militia radicals who constituted the ‘protesters’ in Bunkerville — before Mr. Bundy started talking?

Assemblyman Hansen has something in common with Mr. Bundy, both have refused to pay fines for illegal operations.  Assemblyman Hansen has an ongoing feud with the Nevada Department of Wildlife who fined him for placing snare traps too close to a highway. They fined him, he refused to pay. [RGJ]  Sound familiar?

Assemblywoman Fiore seemed happy to bask in right wing praise for her TV time discussing the situation with Cliven Bundy, [CL] She’s also happy to tell us she’s a lifetime member of the NRA, who is pleased to support open carry on school campuses. [TNV] [HJ] Perhaps the question should be not why she’s backing the likes of Cliven Bundy, but why it took her so long?

And, no, the Nevada Democratic Party probably won’t be getting any apologies from these people or explanations as to why they chose to support a radical, racist, law breaker any time soon.

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