Simple Economics Made Complex: Capitalism vs. Financialism

The 2012 election at almost every level will be determined by turn out, and predicated on economics — micro and macro.  The problem for most voters is that we’re talking about two economies.  The economy of the financialists and the economy of the capitalists.  So far, the capitalists are winning.  Barely.

A capitalist believes that our economy works best when consumers have a choice of products from a variety of manufacturers or providers.  The economy expands as the demand for goods and services increases and providers seek to accommodate consumer needs.  A capitalist believes that capital should move from areas of surplus to areas of shortage, for small business lines of credit, for home loans, for student loans, for consumer credit, for business expansion, for commerce and marketing needs.

A financialist believes that the economy serves to accumulate wealth such that we create financial products and services which can be securitized and manipulated to create more wealth.   The financialists have been doing very well, thank you very much.  Not sure, then consider this chart:

That’s right, 93% of the increases in American income (wealth) in 2010 went to the top 1% of income owners in the U.S.  And the stock market has been doing quite well since 2009:

Of course, it’s not just stocks in which we find increased trading.  Other financial products, derivatives included, have been doing a thriving trade.

The traffic in derivatives hasn’t slowed much either.

So, while those whose income comes from the financial sector have been doing quite well, those in the “real” economy — the capitalist economy have been in something of a bind.

Note, Governor Romney’s complaint that the current economy means “stagnating” wages for middle class Americans he’s omitting a crucial bit of information:  When economic policies favor the accumulation of wealth in the coffers of the o.01%, it shouldn’t be the least bit surprising that middle class Americans aren’t seeing the increases in their bank accounts.

In short, the Financialists (and their presidential candidate Governor Mitt Romney) having secured a deregulated financial sector which rewards them disproportionately, are loathe to adopt any policy which might require them to pay more in taxes or to comply with any regulations on the financial product manipulation which constitutes their wealth accumulation strategy.

It’s up to the Capitalists in the 2012 election to secure a level playing field, or at least a more level field, one in which INVESTMENT is rewarded before SPECULATION.   One in which the economic reality of supply and demand means the supply and demand in REAL markets — not in esoteric “markets” for artificially concocted risk management products.

Let’s hope the Capitalists win.

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