No Thanks For Your Lip Service

Veterans DayAnother Veterans Day, another lesson in the difference between “Thank You for your service,” and “Thank You” for your service.  Bunting and bands are lovely.  Donated meals are a nice gesture, as are donations to the various organizations which assist veterans and their families.   However, as far as I’m concerned those who proudly plaster their windows and bumpers with “Support The Troops” displays while voting for members of the U.S. Congress who do not support appropriate improvements in services for veterans are merely giving lip service to those who’ve done us a real service.

As of the Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract 2010 (pdf) there were 2,076,987 veterans in the United States, of whom 189,662 were disabled.  There are 27,386 veterans in Nevada, of whom 1,882 are disabled.   As we might obviously expect, most of our veterans were enlisted personnel.  {see table 510 CBSA pdf}

Putting Some Legislation Where Our Mouths Are?

So, who is supporting those veterans with legislation to improve the quality of their lives?  Let’s look at the dismal history of H.R. 466, initially introduced in the 111th Congress.   Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-TX35) put the Wounded Veteran Job Security Act in the hopper on January 13, 2009.  It passed the House on June 8, 2009.  The bill was sent to the Senate, where it went to the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee.   Nothing further was seen of the bill.

The bill, the Congressional summary of which is:

“Wounded Veteran Job Security Act – Expands the definition of “service in the uniformed services” for the purposes of uniformed servicemembers’ employment and reemployment rights to include a period for which a person is absent from a position of employment to obtain medical treatment for an injury or illness recognized as service connected by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs (VA), or for which a line-of-duty document has been granted by the Secretary of Defense (DOD). Directs such a person intending to return to a position of employment to notify the employer within a specified time period. Requires a person submitting an application for reemployment due to such an absence for medical treatment to provide the employer, upon request, with documentation to establish eligibility for reemployment, including a link between the injury or illness and the medical treatment obtained.”

seemed like a common sense piece of legislation. So, Rep. Doggett re-introduced it as H.R. 2875 in the 112th Congress.  This time it was referred to the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee, chaired by Rep. Jefferson Miller (R-FL) from which it never emerged.   Rep. Doggett kept trying.

In the 113th Congress the Wounded Veteran Job Security Act was numbered H.R. 1774, and was introduced in September 2013.  It was promptly sent to the Economic Opportunity subcommittee of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee, chaired by Texas Republican Bill Flores (R-TX17).  No further action has been taken on H.R. 1774.

In short, a bill which would protect the job security of a veteran seeking  treatment for a service connected medical issue, can’t seem to get through the Republican controlled House of Representatives in the past two sessions.  Even GOP sponsored bills can’t seem to make it through the Congress — witness the sad tale of H.R. 1293 the Disabled Veterans Home Improvement and Structural Alteration Grant Increase Act of 2009.  The bill would increase the home modification funds for disabled veterans from $4,100 to $6,800.  [GovTrack] The bill passed the House 426-0 on July 28, 2009 — a person might have thought it had a chance in the divided, filibuster riddled,  Senate?  No, nothing happened.  See: [Veterans Guidebook to Opportunities and Benefits: How to Navigate the Funding Process and Services U.S. Senator Kirsten E. Gillibrand New York 2013, download]

Unfortunately, these aren’t the only examples of our flag pin bedecked Congress members speaking one way and acting another.  On September 19, 2012 the IAVA was moved to outrage over the failure of a Jobs for Veterans bill blocked by a Republican filibuster in the Senate:

“Today, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA), the nation’s first and largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, expressed outrage at the Senate’s failure to pass the Veterans Job Corps Act (VJC) – which would help put thousands of young veterans back to work. With Congress shutting down to campaign, no employment legislation will pass until after the election. And with the unemployment rate officially at 10.9%, veterans across the country are left treading water while Congress blocks legislation with procedural tricks.”

Words which might apply just as well in November 2013 as in 2012.  Words are fine…some action would be preferable.

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