Welfare Royalty and Nevada Taxpayers

There’s good economic news for northern Nevada – Tesla’s coming to town.  What might not be so delightful is the $1.25 billion tax deal Nevada gave to the corporation to get the factory. There’s a 20 year sales tax abatement ($725 million), a 10 year property tax abatement ($332 million),  another $120 million in transferable tax credits, $75 million in transferrable job tax credits, $27 million in modified business tax abatement for 10 years, and $8 million in discounted electricity for 8 years.   [RGJ]  A bit of quick calculation shows that if the plant generates 6,500 jobs and the tax abatements and credits cost, say, $1.2 billion, then the price tag for each job was about $184,615.  Granting that these costs are spread over a 10-20 year period, it’s up to the view of the beholder as to whether this is a bargain. What’s not a bargain are the other corporate subsidies Nevada is handing out every day to the New Welfare Queens.

For example, there are 4,281 Wal-Mart stores in the United States,  and the retail giant operates 30 stores, 2 discount stores, 11 neighborhood markets, and 7 Sam’s Club stores in Nevada. Its associates are paid an average of $13.59/hr.  for full time workers.  [WM]  That wage figure yields annual wages of approximately $27,180 per year.  The federal poverty line for a family of four is $23,850.  133% of that number is $31,720, the percentage is important because that’s the eligibility line for adults qualifying for Medicaid. [NVM]  Thus, the average worker with an average sized family is qualified for Medicaid coverage, and Nevada Check Up coverage, in this state.  Our average worker ($13.59) would receive about $2,174 per month, the SNAP gross income eligibility line is $2,498 per month. [NDW]

This doesn’t make Wal-Mart in Nevada unique, in fact as of last November it was reported that Wal-Mart employees made up the single largest block of Medicaid recipients.  [Bloomberg]

This state of affairs doesn’t make Wal-Mart unique among low wage paying employers.  The fast food joints, currently in the news for being the target of employee picketing, aren’t any better.  The median annual wage for a counter attendant at your local burger establishment is $18,930. [DETR] If the Wal-Mart employees are eligible for Medicaid, Check Up, and SNAP benefits, those counter attendants are truly in the eligibility category.  Additionally, let’s get rid of some silly myths about minimum wage jobs in the fast food industry.

The most common myth is that there’s no reason to worry about wages for fast food employees because most of them are teens earning their first paychecks, and working for pocket money.  No.  Half of all fast food workers are over the age of 23, and about 30% of all fast food establishment personnel are between the ages of 16-19. 36.4% are between the ages of 25 and 54.   [CEPR pdf]

The second bit of malarkey coming from the corporate lobbyists is that the picketing for higher wages is just a screen for union organizing.  Indeed, there are some labor union organization efforts going on – and why not? If workers are being paid minimal wages and aren’t seeing any prospects of advancement (only about 2.2% of fast food workers hold managerial positions) then organizing is an obvious option.   It’s an especially appealing option when the corporate financial statements are taken into account.

Your local McDonald’s franchise is part of a corporation with a $91.31 billion market cap, with an enterprise value of $103.09 billion.   It has a 19.48% profit margin, and a 30.12% operating margin.  To date it has reported revenue of $28.30 billion.  The corporation boasts a 35.19% return on equity. [YahFin]  Its top institutional shareholders are Vanguard, State Street, BlackRock ITC, Bank of America, Massachusetts Financial Services, Bank of NY Mellon, FMR LLC, Northern Trust, BlackRock Fund Advisors, and Wellington Management LLP. [YahFin

The point of serving all those burgers – composed of whatever they might be – is to enhance shareholder value.  What would better enhance ‘shareholder value’ than keeping costs as low as possible, including the cost of preparing and serving the Happy Meal?  If the taxpayers are willing to pick up the tab for the  employees’ health care and basic needs for food and shelter, then so much the better for those institutional shareholders who retain some 64.6% of the corporation.

It’s important to differentiate between welfare recipients – people who are trying to clothe, feed, and shelter their families – from the Welfare Queens who are trying to enhance the incomes of their institutional investors and keep those shareholders satisfied, while the taxpayers of the state have to subsidize their employees, provide their streets, roads, communication infrastructure, and their police and fire protection.  Nice deal, if you can get it?

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