Shady Lender Protection Act heard in Nevada Legislature Committee

AB 282

Perhaps this was a good week to revisit “Margin Call?”  Why? Because Fiore and Friends are promoting AB 282 in the Nevada state Legislature.

“AB 282: AN ACT relating to real property; revising provisions governing mediation of a judicial foreclosure action; revising provisions requiring certain actions related to the foreclosure of owner-occupied property securing a residential mortgage loan to be rescinded after a certain period; revising provisions governing civil actions brought by a borrower for certain violations of law governing the foreclosure of owner-occupied property securing a residential mortgage loan…”

This bill is on today’s agenda in the Assembly Judiciary Committee.  Might it be suggested that the informal title of the bill be “The Shady Lender Protection Act of 2015?”  Here’s why:

“Existing law provides that in a judicial foreclosure action concerning owner- occupied property, the mortgagor may elect to participate in the program of foreclosure mediation. (NRS 40.437) Section 1 of this bill removes provisions governing the process of such mediation and the documents required to be brought to the mediation. Section 1 instead requires the Nevada Supreme Court to adopt rules governing the mediation.” (emphasis added)

Let’s start with the part wherein the Nevada foreclosure mediation process has been successful.  It’s been especially beneficial for borrowers in owner occupied homes who want to avoid foreclosure. [nolo] Perhaps this is why Fiore and Friends and so dead set against it?  So, what are those documents required in the process?

“Nevada’s mediation program requires that borrowers and the lender provide the mediator and each other with certain documents prior to the mediation. The borrower must provide appropriate documentation, such as financial information, so that the lender can make a determination about whether the borrower is eligible for a loan workout. The lender must provide documents such as the original note, deed of trust, and assignments (or certified copies).” [nolo]

Remember those bad old days, the ones in the wake of the housing bubble debacle?  Those were the days during which lenders were seeking to foreclose properties on which they didn’t have the paperwork necessary to prove who held the mortgage.  And at this point we return to the messy problem of MERS.

MERS was an ‘electronic’ recording of mortgages which was supposed to facilitate the assignment of mortgages etc. at high speed – speed high enough to sate the demand from Wall Street for more and more and more mortgages to slice, dice, tranche, and otherwise divide into financial products for marketing.  The idea was that county recorders weren’t fast enough to keep pace with the Wall Street demand for mortgages in the secondary market.  The fall out from the MERS mess is still being felt in parts of the country. [Harpers]

Thus, what AB 282 does is to (1) eliminate a mediation process which has been successful in Nevada, and (2) eliminates the documentation requirements now on the books according to which the borrowers must provide their financial information and the lenders must prove they own the paperwork on the property.  We can guess who’s having problems with the paperwork, but an article in the Reno Gazette Journal in 2012 provides some interesting details:

“Data from the same report (on program effectiveness) , however, have some questioning what the program’s definition of good faith is. Out of the 3,183 total cases from the same time period, banks did not bring all the required documents in 1,149 cases — a rate of 36 percent.

JPMorgan Chase topped the list, failing to bring all necessary documents in 52 percent of its cases. Ally/GMAC was second at 50 percent, followed by Bank of America at 41 percent, US Bank at 32 percent and Wells Fargo at 31 percent. Citigroup posted the lowest rate of the six banks mentioned at 12 percent.”

And, why did the banks have problems with the paperwork?  They didn’t have it. The Great Wall Street Mortgage Mill had shredded the mortgages into sliced and diced financial products in which nobody knew who really owned what – much less what the paper was really worth.

“They want the original paperwork and not a certified copy, which becomes an issue for mortgages that have been securitized (into investments),” Uffelman said. “Once a mortgage gets securitized, the paperwork ends up in a different place and can be tough for a servicer to track down and pull back together. The more you securitize stuff, the easier it is to screw things up.” [RGJ 2012]

And screw things up they did. Since Wall Street was in such a glorious rush to manufacture asset based securities on offer in the Casino, the recording and other record keeping practices were lost in the great paper shuffle.  Only in the imagination of Wall Street sycophants does this create a problem to be borne solely by the homeowner.

If we look at the latest report (pdf) from the program we see the nature of the continuing documentation problem:

“Of the 1,894 mediations held during FY 2014, 73 percent resulted in the homeowner and the lender not coming to an agreement to retain or relinquish the property. In 28 percent of these cases, no resolution was reached because the lender failed to prove it had the authority to foreclose, or the lender failed to prove ownership of the deed of trust or the mortgage note.”  

“For example, in 319 cases, the beneficiary failed to bring the required certifications for each endorsement of the mortgage note. By statute, the lender must provide a certified deed of trust, a certification of each assignment of the deed of trust, a certified mortgage note, and a certification of each endorsement and/or assignment of the mortgage note.”

And just so borrowers aren’t inclined to take on the banks in a questionable foreclosure, AB 282 limits the time line for the mediation process, drops awards from $50,000 to $5,000, and eliminates the recovery of attorney fees by a prevailing borrower.

The Legislature already has AB 360 The Annuities Saleman’s Friend Bill in the hopper, and now the financialists must be rubbing their palms at the prospect of the Ultra-Big-Bank-Friendly AB 282!

AB 282 is a bill for the Banks, for the Wall Street Casino Players, for the Speculators, for the Financialists – and it is NOT a bill which does anything for average Nevada families.   As the session progresses it’s becoming ever more clear who the Nevada Republicans are supporting – and it’s definitely not Nevada homeowners.

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