Distracted to Distraction?

carnival barker What are there? Some 412 days until the next general election, and the broadcast media is behaving like that is going to happen any moment? Perhaps we might call the campaign thus far, as presented by the beltway media and associated punditry, “The Click Bait Campaign?”  There are as many explanations for why the campaign appearances and speeches by Democratic candidates (Clinton, Sanders, etc.) aren’t getting the press coverage garnered by the Republican Clown Car as there are Punditatti to express them.  But while the press-gangs muse about whether Secretary Clinton is seen as “reliable,” or if Senator Sanders is perceived as “electable,” of if candidate Fiorina is “crisp and effective”… or if candidate Trump is “serious”… we’re missing some issues that deserve far more attention than the National ADHD click bait coverage is giving us.  Here’s what I’m waiting to hear more about.

The national economy.  The candidate who can convince me that he or she understands the shape of the American economy is probably the one who will get my vote.  Surely someone can clarify and amplify the changes in the U.S. economy in the past forty years:

“Previously, income grew more or less in step with household wealth. From 1962 to 1966, a period of low inflation and robust economic growth, real private sector wages rose 27.5 percent while real net worth increased 23.6 percent, according to Bloomberg News calculations based on government data. In the five-year period ending in 1996, real net worth gained 15.6 percent while private wages grew 11.3 percent. More recently, the gap between household net worth and wage growth has widened. From 2001 to 2005, the value of household assets minus liabilities rose 16.6 percent after inflation. Private sector wages rose just 2.7 percent.” [Bloomberg 2006]

Thus we  have an hour-glass economy, [Salmon, Reuters] one in which the wealth is concentrated at the upper end of the scale, and more occupations continue fall into the low-income levels. [Salon]  Senator Sanders has made continuous reference to the Income Inequality Gap, [Sanders] and Secretary Clinton has made this topic part of her repertoire on the campaign trail. [WSJ]

By February 2015 someone on the Republican side of the aisle noticed the Income Inequality gap (hour glass economy) [NYT] and Senator Marco Rubio attempted to slot into the issue by suggesting expanding the Child Tax Credit and cutting the tax brackets from seven to two (15% and 35%) unfortunately there’s no suggestion as to how to pay for this. Nor does he specify how to pay for expanding tax credits to childless adults; put simply, his arithmetic doesn’t work.  [NYT]  And, then there’s the rather tired Republican “promise” to create “flex funds” – another way of expressing the block grant anti-poverty programs proposal which lends itself nicely to eventual (and predictable) cuts to the grants by Congress.  In short, there’s nothing much new here: Credit Card Conservatism, and cuts to anti-poverty programs.  Meanwhile, we have the Limping Middle Class.

Perhaps we need a What To Watch For List?

  • Which candidates are speaking of a taxation system which rewards work and not just wealth?
  • Which candidates are addressing the decline in middle class income jobs in this country?
  • Which candidates are advocating equal pay for equal work? And/or an increase in funding for child care?
  • Which candidates are proposing an increase in the federal minimum wage?
  • Which candidates are suggesting we need to address the restoration of the manufacturing sector in this country?
  • Which candidates are supportive of workers’ rights to organize and form unions to bring more balance with multi-national corporations?
  • Which candidates are advocating funding for the improvement and maintenance of our national infrastructure?

It may be difficult to listen for these points since the media seems intent on speculating about the “electoral” effect of what candidates are proposing instead of explaining or clarifying the implications of their policy positions.  Meanwhile the media focuses on “Abortion!” or the “Planned Parenthood” hoax videos – the “Email,” the “Islamists!” the Whatever Will Get The Clicks of the Day.  A little over 412 days from now Americans will vote, and we’ll probably cast ballots based on the issue that is and remains the top American concern: It’s the Economy Stupid. Or, It’s the Stupid Economy.

Recommended: Robert Reich, “The Limping Middle Class,” New York Times, 9/03/11.  Danny Vinik, “Marco Rubio…”, New Republic, 1/14/15. Brendan Nyham, “Why Republicans are suddenly talking about economic inequality,” New York Times, 2/13/15.  Andrew Leonard, “The Hour Glass Economy,” Salon, 9/13/15.  Future of Jobs, “In an Hourglass Economy,” transcript, Marketplace.org, 8/2011. Bernard Starr, “Corporations Plan for a Post Middle Class America,” Business, Huffington Post, 4/6/12.  Mollie Reilly, “Thomas Piketty calls out Republican hypocrisy on income inequality,” Huffington Post, 3/11/15.

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