Physicians Could Use A Bit Of Healing in Nevada: Opioid Prescription Problems

oxycontin  The Reno Gazette Journal has done a piece of highly recommended reporting – an in-depth account of opioid prescribing in Nevada.

“…a Reno Gazette-Journal analysis of DEA data showed that for certain drugs, Nevada ranks among the highest in the country.

Take oxycodone, Nevada’s most widely prescribed opioid. In 2012, nearly 1.04 million grams was distributed via retail in the state. That’s more than double what doctors prescribed in 2006. Nevada’s distribution rate is third highest in the country.

Nevada also ranks third for its hydrocodone distribution rate. In 2012, doctors prescribed more than 799,000 grams of hydrocodone — nearly three times the rate of New Jersey, which has triple Nevada’s population.”

OC pill There are some important points to take away from the article.  One of the first is that physicians, themselves, have opposed greater oversight of opioid distribution to patients, specifically in regard to SB 459.  One physician testified to the Assembly Committee on Health and Human Services that SB 459 sections 1-12 should be adopted, but the rest of the bill including reporting and medical education requirements should be dropped because it wouldn’t prevent overdoses. [AHHS pdf] Another doctor offering testimony “went there,” comparing the regulation of opioids to Nazi Germany:

“When people come to Las Vegas and need surgery or have chronic conditions and they hear that the climate here is like Nazi Germany in terms of regulations, the tightening of prescription pain medications, and the prosecution of doctors, it has a very chilling effect on these people who need those medications. […] there are folks who have chronic pain. I am an internist and I see this every single day. I sit there arguing with them about cutting their medications down and they start crying and throwing a fit because they need it.”  [AHHS pdf]

He continued:

We pull the DEA reports now and, as a private practitioner with a two- or three-man office, it creates a lot of extra work for my staff and more
documentation. It makes me pause every time I start to write a script for any controlled substance; I should not have to feel like that. At the end of the day, the doctor and the patient have the relationship, not the government in the middle. Doctors should be the ones who decide what is best for their patients. This bill has a chilling effect on that. [AHHS pdf]

The good news is that the language requiring that a doctor check the prescription drug monitoring database before writing a prescription for a narcotic to a new patient was retained in the bill.  However, the testimony presented should cause some alarm from members of the general public.

OC pill

As the article points out, a state with one third of the population of another probably shouldn’t be prescribing three times the amount of narcotic painkillers.

The argument that the state legislature shouldn’t try to do something to mitigate the problem if the proposal won’t fix the entire problem sounds altogether too analogous to the NRA’s arguments for doing absolutely nothing to prevent guns getting into the hands of felons, fugitives, and domestic batterers.  “If it doesn’t solve the whole problem, then it shouldn’t be done.”  The second piece of testimony is, itself, chilling.

Hyperbole rarely provides productive content in a civic discussion, and Godwin’s Law applies.  Bring up Hitler, and the audience moves along assuming the argument has been abandoned.  Secondly, it’s a bit more than disturbing that a licensed physician would be argued into prescribing medication he or she knows is deleterious or even dangerous for a given patient.

OC pill

No one wants the Hot Potato.  The state pharmacy board doesn’t want to use its database to flag doctors who are over-prescribing narcotics.  Their director: “Who’s to say what’s normal or what’s OK,” Pinson said. “It might be appropriate for a physician to be prescribing a ton of narcotics according to his specialty.” [RGJ]  It might be, and then again, it might very well not be. And the Board of Medical Examiners isn’t enthusiastic about clearing out their ranks either:

“It would be inappropriate, and it’s not the intent of the (prescription monitoring program), to find cases to investigate,” said Edward Cousineau, executive director of the Board of Medical Examiners, which licenses medical doctors and investigates malpractice complaints in the state.” [RGJ]

Again, we might ask: Why isn’t it appropriate to weed out physicians who are creating a situation in which Nevada is among the top five states for opioid pushing? Perhaps the next session of Nevada’s Assembled Wisdom will find the intestinal fortitude to (1) require that the Pharmacy Board use its drug monitoring database to look for BOTH doctor shopping patients and pill pushing physicians; and (2) more thoroughly investigate drug overdose deaths. 

OC pill

Kentucky, Tennessee, Texas, and Arizona have enacted such legislation. [RGJ] Nevada should join them.

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