Heck’s Campaign: Saddled with Trump?

Heck Trump

Let’s start with the fact that 27.8% of Nevada’s population is of Hispanic or Latino descent.[Census] And, that of the 2,890,845 people in this state some 49.7% are women. [Census]  Now, add in information about voting demographics in this state:

    • From 2012 to 2016, voters of color will jump from 36 percent of the state’s electorate to 39.4 percent.
    • Asian American eligible voters will reach 11 percent of the Nevada electorate in 2016.
    • If the Latino vote share sees the same growth as is projected for the share of Latino eligible voters, more than one in five voters in the state in 2016, or 21.2 percent, will be Latino for the first time ever, up from 19 percent in 2012.

Not that the Heck campaign for the U.S. Senate would ever ask my advice, but I would offer this:  Given the statistics I would not advise doing anything to tick off women or people of Hispanic descent if I were to run for a statewide office in Nevada.  Nor would I try to hook my message on a mistake:

“End birthright citizenship. This remains the biggest magnet for illegal immigration. By a 2:1 margin, voters say it’s the wrong policy, including Harry Reid who said “no sane country” would give automatic citizenship to the children of illegal immigrants.” [Trump Campaign]

There are two problems herein.  It probably isn’t very helpful to attach oneself to a 1993 proposal about which the author said:

“Reid then talked about how, shortly thereafter, he was assailed at a town-hall meeting on his bill by Hispanic friends, and added, “I have done everything since that meeting in Las Vegas, in conversation with my wife, to undo my embarrassment.”  And, “In 1993, Reid’s bill died in the Senate Judiciary Committee. Reid has said it was the biggest mistake of his legislative career. It has come back to haunt him .” [DrmAct]

Secondly, there are some very serious possible consequences of tinkering with the concept of birthright citizenship.  It’s time for a reality check:

“The reality is this: Repealing birthright citizenship would create a self-perpetuating class that would be excluded from social membership for generations. Working with researchers at Pennsylvania State University, the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) has found that ending birthright citizenship for U.S. babies with two unauthorized immigrant parents would increase the existing unauthorized population by 4.7 million people by 2050. Crucially, 1 million would be the children of two parents who themselves had been born in the United States. Under a scenario denying U.S. citizenship to babies with one parent who is unauthorized, our analysis finds that the unauthorized population would balloon to 24 million in 2050 from the 11 million today.

This last finding alone should give pause. Touted by its supporters as a solution to reduce illegal immigration, repeal in fact would have the completely opposite effect.” [MP org]

Thus, instead of “fixing” a problem, the repeal proponents are advocating a “solution” which  exacerbates it.  If we need an example of how badly things can go wrong – look to the Japanese importation of Korean laborers in the 1940s and the subsequent denial of citizenship opportunities.  [UCDavisEdu]

And then there’s the issue with The Women.  It’s about power, asserting power, using power, and that of course means putting women “in their place:”

“Women labor under a cloud of Trump’s distrust. “I have seen women manipulate men with just a twitch of their eye—or perhaps another body part,” he wrote in Trump: The Art of the Comeback. Working moms are particularly lacking in loyalty, he believes, and thus do not make for good employees. “She’s not giving me 100 percent. She’s giving me 84 percent, and 16 percent is going towards taking care of children,” he told Mika Brzezinski. (Further evidence of his dim view of working moms: Trump once notoriously blurted that the pumping of breast milk in the office is “disgusting.”)”  [Slate]

One can only wonder what other gems are to be found in the archives of Howard Stern’s radio program?   So, we’re left with some questions candidate Heck should answer:

Do you support repealing birthright citizenship?  If so can you explain how its repeal will not create a permanent underclass of exploited workers?

Do you support the comments made by candidate Donald Trump on (1) working mothers?  (2) Which of the five different positions on the issue of abortion candidate Trump took in three days during late March/early April 2016 do you support? [WaPo] (3) How do you interpret candidate Trump’s life and life style as it relates to Family Values?

Comments Off on Heck’s Campaign: Saddled with Trump?

Filed under Heck, Immigration, Nevada politics, Politics

Comments are closed.