Health, Wealth, and Senator Heller: Recommended Reading

Health care continues as a high priority item for Nevadans, and Greg Sargent’s article for the Washington Post points out how the “GOP Stunt Backfired…and why,” is highly recommended for pulling the tarpaulin off the GOP obfuscation concerning the Affordable Care Act.  The New York Times reports on the impact of the health insurance battle on other elements of the GOP agenda.  Ian Millhiser warns us that if we stop paying attention, the GOP wins.  Meanwhile,…

Senator Dean Heller continues to spout the party lines (the part under the tarp) while ostensibly opposing the repeal bill:

“Under the ACA, premiums have increased 7 times faster than wages, and federal regulations under the law’s employer mandate have cut workers’ hours, wages, or both.”

Nothing like tossing one’s apples and oranges together and expecting to get grape juice.  Some significant elements are missing from this pithy bit of prose.  First, premiums have increased, but not at an equal pace in all states. Secondly, the rate of premium increases have slowed during the implementation of the ACA.  Third, wages have been stagnant during the past decade, but that has little to do with the enactment of health care insurance reform — in fact, lower wage working Americans were included in the Medicaid expansion– the very program the GOP wants to slash in order to provide tax cuts to wealthy Americans.

Senator Heller believes that re-importation of prescription drugs and allowing insurance purchases across state lines are part of the solution.  Notice that he’s not in favor of so much competition as to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices in the manner allowed to the Veterans Administration.  Also notice that he’s not mentioning that some states have rather more lax requirements for the sale of comprehensive health insurance than others.  The “across state lines,” or “portability argument” sounds good until we recall that states build in consumer protections into their regulatory frameworks.  If we could be guaranteed that portability would be a function of the most rigorous consumer protections there’s something to be discussed herein; if not, it’s simply a formula for a race to the bottom.

This is no time to remove our attention to the decimation of health insurance affordability —

Senator Heller can be reached in Las Vegas at 702-388-6605; Reno at 775-686-5770; and DC at 202-224-6244.

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