Category Archives: health insurance

GOP: Poor Excuses and Paucity of Empathy

By all accounts the Graham-Cassidy+Heller version of health care destruction would yield a net coverage reduction for 243,000 Nevadans. Overall it would mean a 31% cut in Medicaid for children — that’s right — children.  There’s another 15% cut for services for people with disabilities.  And what’s the rationale for this atrocity?

(1) Because we promised!  This is probably the silliest reason to do anything ever.  I may have promised to offer someone a ride to go shopping, but if there’s a blizzard on the way then it’s downright stupid to “keep the promise.”

(2) Because Obamacare is failing!  And why would that be? Because Republicans refused to make some simple fixes (risk corridors, risk sharing, and reinsurance) and the individual health insurance is unstable.  It’s a classic case of tossing the baby out with the bathwater.  Or, of finding some perfectly “fixable” problems with a law and using those to rationalize pitching the entire thing.  Head UP: They’ll try this same approach with the financial sector reforms in the Dodd Frank Act.

And then there’s the part the Republicans aren’t talking about.

(3) Because they’ve wanted to get rid of Medicaid, Medicare, and to privatize Social Security from time out of mind.

This comment sums up the situation:

“The two keys to the Republican attitude are money and ideology. If you view the modern G.O.P. as basically a mechanism to protect the wealthy, Medicaid is an obvious target for the Party. The program caters to low- and middle-income people, and its recent expansion was financed partly by an increase in taxes on the richest households in the country.”

The concept can’t be articulated more simply or directly.

Then there are the sputtered talking points, common among Republican politicians and supporters to hike around the obvious but unspoken issues they have with the Affordable Care Act.

If we don’t pass this we’ll have socialized medicine.  Please.  Even Single Payer (or Medicare for all) isn’t socialized medicine.  Medicare insurance is used to pay PRIVATE providers for medical treatment.  This obviously isn’t a nationalized medical service plan.  Only by artificially conflating medical insurance with medical services can anyone assert that this is “socialism.”

There are no guarantees in life.  So if a family in Minnesota who has a child with muscular dystrophy may be required to pay higher premiums that’s the way the markets work.  It doesn’t get more morally bankrupt than this — especially since the current system does guarantee coverage for families with chronically ill children.

This issue is long past being a public policy issue, it has devolved into pure politics in which ‘points’ are scored by a party desperately hoping to cut taxes for its most generous donors at the cost of Americans’ health care.

So, every few weeks we’ll have to call our Senators to beg them not to destroy the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid for ourselves, our families, our friends, our neighbors, and our fellow citizens.

Call Senator Heller at his Las Vegas Office 702-388-6605; his Reno Office 775-686-5770; or his DC Office 202-224-6244. 

You may also want to call Senator Cortez-Masto to thank her for her support of health care access for Nevadans. 202-224-3542; 702-388-5020; 775-686-5750.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

It’s Official: GOP Hates Women — Scamcare Edition

In case there’s anyone left who thinks the Republican Party is representing the needs of women in this country, the contradiction is right in front of us in the form of the Graham-Cassidy+Heller (tagging along) bill.

Amy Friedrich-Karnik, senior federal policy adviser at the Center for Reproductive Rights, pointed to a statistic from progressive think tank the Century Foundation that estimates 13 million women will lose access to maternity care services if the ACA is repealed. Friedrich-Karnik explained that the bill also blocks Medicaid patients from using Planned Parenthood, which bars access to essential preventative care like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment. “It also slashes Medicaid overall and into the future, and so really impacting particularly low-income women and women of color who rely on Medicaid broadly for their health care,” she said. According to the Kaiser Health Network, Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in America and covers family planning services for 13.5 million women. [Jez]

Not only is the bill a golf ball shot to the back of the head for Nevada women, it could cost the state some $250 million in funding:

Specifically, the proposal would eliminate the marketplace subsidies and federal dollars that states that chose to opt-in to Medicaid expansion under the ACA, like Nevada, currently receive, replacing them with block grants to be doled out to states, which would be left with the responsibility of deciding how to spend that money. It also converts almost the entire Medicaid program to a per capita cap, under which the federal government would set a limit on how much it reimburses states per enrollee, and allows states to waiver certain provisions from the ACA that require insurance companies to cover certain services and bars them from placing annual or lifetime caps on coverage. [NVInd]

Got that? Nevada gets a per capita cap, AND insurance corporations could refuse to cover pre-existing conditions, maternity care, family planning, women’s health care services, AND the corporations could revert to that wonderful old scam — the lifetime limit on coverage.  This isn’t as bad as the former “skinny” bill — it’s worse.

Senator Heller might have wanted to give this version some thought before he inked his name on the paperwork to co-sponsor the bill, but he didn’t.

It’s understandable that Nevadans are tiring of calling, writing, and sign making, but if Republicans are nothing else they are persistent.  They’re counting on public apathy, ignorance, and fatigue.  Not this time. Not on American health care. Not on our watch.

Senator Heller’s Washington DC office number is 202-224-6244.  Calls are tallied, and at some point the number of calls opposing this iteration of scam-care needs to impinge on the amount of money Republicans are counting on from the Koch Brothers and other right wing radicals.

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Hellerisms on Parade: Health Care Edition

And then there was this:

“The individual mandate I thought was atrocious, was wrong and shouldn’t have been in Obamacare at all,” he said. “I don’t think your government should tell you to buy something that you can’t afford. And if you can’t afford it you pay a fine. Yet 90,000 Nevadans pay the fine.” — Senator Dean Heller

Let’s start with the assumption that Senator Dean Heller is a capitalist, a firm believer in the free market system.  He’s certainly reinforced this impression given any occasion to do so.  So, why was there an “individual mandate” in the Affordable Care Act?  — The answer is capitalism.

The more precise answer is the “adverse selection” problem in free markets.  The most concise explication I’ve found for this comes from the Economist’s View:

“To explain how the adverse selection problem arises in these markets, note that people purchasing health insurance generally have better information about their health status than the people selling the insurance. If insurance is offered in this market at somewhere near the average cost of care for the group, people will use the superior information they have about their own health status to determine if this is a good deal for them. All of the people expecting to pay less for health care than the price the companies are asking for the insurance will drop out of the market (the young and healthy for the most part; all that is actually needed is that some people are willing to take a chance and go without insurance). With the relatively healthy people dropping out of the insurance pool, the price of insurance must go up, and when it does, more people drop out, the price goes up again, and the result is just like in the used car example above: The market breaks down and nobody (or hardly anybody) can purchase insurance.”

Now, if a person is reasonably conversant with capitalism and the patterns intrinsic to the operation of free markets, then the problem of  ‘adverse selection’ should be part of that person’s lexicon.  Granted it’s not an easy thing to explain, but the Economist’s View post quoted above offers the “used car” analogical example which makes the concept more accessible.   Therefore, if Senator Heller is indeed a capitalist, and if he has better that average economic knowledge base, then his explanation of his opposition to the individual mandate makes absolutely no sense whatsoever.

There’s also the political side of the issue, recall that Obama’s original plan didn’t contain an individual mandate while Secretary Clinton’s proposal did, and the result:

“Once elected, Obama quickly recognized the inescapable truth: An individual mandate was essential to make the plan work. Without that larger pool of premium-payers, there is no feasible way to require insurance companies to cover all applicants and charge the same amount, regardless of their heath status.” [WaPo]

There’s just no way to get around the problem of Adverse Selection, and still have an insurance system based on free market capitalism. 

Those still unsure about their understanding of Adverse Selection and how it operates in a free market system may want to consult some of the following sources:  Investopedia is a good source for short, concise, definitions of economic terms such as Adverse Selection. The Economic Times also has a dictionary style definition.  Risk Management specialists have a more technical definition.  Those wishing to dive a bit deeper into the weeds might want to see the World Bank’s explication.   There’s also an explanation from the National Association of Insurance Commissioners which goes into greater depth. (pdf)

Granted the individual mandate isn’t popular — that part is easy — but anyone who professes to be a free market capitalist (as does Senator Heller) can’t ignore the principle of Adverse Selection and how that concept impacts the insurance markets.

The alternatives to a purely market based insurance system in which the most people possible can obtain health insurance at relatively affordable rates are problematic for the free-marketeers.  A public option (federally sponsored insurance program operating in the general market) is one possibility.  Another alternative simply removes the free from free market — the single payer, or Medicare for All proposal, in which public insurance pays for medical services delivered in the private market.  At the furthest end of the spectrum would be nationalized medical health services such as the British or French systems. The arguments for and against each of these are ideological and political, and not necessarily relevant to the discussion of free market based health care delivery.  However, they do mitigate, from divergent directions, the issue of Adverse Selection.

The problem for Senator Heller is that he can maintain his free market positions OR he can oppose the individual mandate, but in light of the persistent and perpetual issue of Adverse Selection he can’t do both.

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Filed under Economy, Health Care, health insurance, Heller, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

Amodei: Several Days Late and More Dollars Short

So, Representative Mark Amodei (R-NV2) spent time with reporters to talk about (1) Race relations in America? — uh, that would be “no.” Or, (2) American strategy in the Middle East and South Asia? — no, not that either. Perhaps it was (3) Infrastructure investment and jobs programs?  — no, that didn’t form a major part of his remarks. Maybe it was (4) tax reform, or at least tax cuts?  — well, that wasn’t a focal point either.  He wanted to talk about health insurance, “repeal and replace,” as if the GOP hadn’t bungled its strategy and tactics to an extent that was truly remarkable in modern politics.

Never one to climb out on even the sturdiest branch and get ahead of the game, or even to keep up with the topics at hand, Representative Amodei continues to play the “repeal and replace” tune without acknowledging that his party had seven years to come up with a viable, specific, and practical PLAN to replace the Affordable Care Act.  Not to put too fine a point to it:  They Blew It.   However, this doesn’t prevent the Representative from belaboring the issue, rather like listening to someone who persists in telling us what he did on Labor Day during the New Year’s Eve party.

 

 

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Filed under Amodei, Health Care, health insurance, Nevada politics, Politics

Heller’s Dipsy Doodle on Health Care: Centene Edition

Here we have Senator Dean Heller’s comments on access to health care insurance in Nevada — and some translation.

“I welcome Centene’s announcement that it will offer plans on the Nevada exchange, providing Nevadans with additional health care options so that no county in our state is bare. I was proud to work with Governor Sandoval to make sure that people living in all of Nevada’s 17 counties have the option to purchase coverage on the exchange next year,” said Senator Dean Heller. “Nevadans have been left with dwindling choices when it comes to their health care coverage, and it’s more evidence that Obamacare is failing. That’s why I continue to work for health care solutions – like the Graham-Cassidy-Heller plan – that return power to the states, protect Nevada’s most vulnerable, and repeal Obamacare’s onerous mandates that continue to squeeze hardworking Nevadans who can least afford it.”

Huh?  Working with Governor Sandoval to make sure people can purchase health insurance plans in the individual market certainly wasn’t in evidence when Senator Heller voted in favor of the last Senate version of the risible ‘repeal and replace with nothing’ bill.

And, no, the ‘dwindling choices” aren’t the product of failing ACA provisions — the choices are dwindling because insurance corporations are facing unpredictable (anathema to insurance) situations created by the President’s threat to cut the cost sharing provisions, which Senator Heller persists in inferring are “insurance company bailouts.”

And, there’s that Graham-Cassidy amendment to which Senator Heller amended himself, which turns Medicaid into a block grant program with an altered formula and which cuts lower income family’s access to affordable insurance plans in the individual market.  That, to put it mildly, isn’t a solution.

And so it goes…into the 2018 election.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Nevada news, Nevada politics, Politics

It’s A National Emergency, we think…

Since his attempt to revive Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” campaign in the face of a crisis in the increased addiction to opioid drugs in this country fell flat,  Dear Leader appeared to suggest the problem is a matter of law enforcement — a major mistake.  The genesis of the issue comes from the over-prescribing and over use of opioid medication once advertised as “virtually addiction free.”  Indeed, Purdue Pharma is still facing litigation from the state of New Hampshire over its advertising of Oxycontin. This, in addition to the 2007 guilty plea from the corporation for mislabeling the drug, and the payment of  $634.5 million to resolve a DoJ investigation.  Meanwhile, Nevada holds its unfortunate position in the top ten states when counting opioid death rates.  There were 224 overdose deaths in 2014, another 259 in 2015 [CDC] related to natural and semi-synthetic opioids; Nevada’s statistics were more bleak citing some 465 opioid related deaths in 2015.

Since we probably can’t arrest our way out of this mess, in Nevada or anywhere else, the answer in the long run is prevention (better guidance for physicians and tracking, combined with better public education on the nature of opioid addiction) and treatment.  And, for treatment, people have to have a way to afford it.

Medicaid has been a Godsend for many suffering through an opioid addiction.

“The authors of the report (Urban Institute) draw a parallel between the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion and spending on addiction medications, saying it has brought addiction treatment to previously underserved populations.

“What we saw was this gigantic, rapid, ongoing expansion in treatment,” says co-author Lisa Clemans-Cope. “It was particularly fast after 2014 when the big Medicaid expansion came into play. There’s definitely an effect of people getting access to treatment. That’s the primary driver of growth of spending.”

So, Medicaid spent more on treatment after 2014 – because more people were in a position to afford the treatment programs available to them.  Therefore, the next time a Republican politician stands before us with plans to slash Medicaid spending, and turn the Medicaid program into a block grant lottery for the states, we might well ask:  What does your proposal do to assist the states, like Nevada, deal with the treatment expenses of individuals trying to cope with opioid addiction and who are seeking assistance to make that treatment affordable.

Gee, the states are supposed to “benefit” from greater flexibility?  Would that be the flexibility to choose between supporting special education children with speech and physical therapy and opiate addicts?  Or choosing between the needs of the families of opiate addicts and the severely disabled?  Or choosing between the needs of opiate addicts seeking treatment and women seeking mammograms and other cancer screenings?  Santa doesn’t come without some expense.

Somehow the Republicans have managed to entangle themselves in their own rhetoric.  We can cut taxes, expand the military, all by cutting social safety net programs, and still have money for fighting opioid addiction in this country!  Santa will bring us tax cuts and another Santa will keep Granny in the skilled nursing facility, help cousin Elwood find a job in a new industry, make sure the family can get immunizations, cancer screenings, treatment for acute and chronic medical conditions, and insure that the Interstate Highway System is continually maintained.

It’s Jude Wanniski’s Two Santa Theory — a position only definable as something coming from an opiate induced delusion:

“Unfortunately, Mr. Wanniski opened Pandora’s box when he let loose the two-Santa theory. Republicans are now bound to it, whether they know it or not. As Keynes once put it, “Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back.”

**For more information: See the following excellent articles in the Nevada Independent — “Another side of the opioid heroin crisis,” “For Many Governors…” “As Out of Control opioid epidemic rages..”

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Filed under Economy, health insurance, Medicaid, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

Thanks Mr. Trump: Anthem Pulls Out of ACA market

This from Fortune magazine on Anthem’s decision to pull out of the Nevada health insurance exchange:

“In its announcement, Anthem said it had spoken with state leaders and regulators, but the deteriorating market, paired with uncertainty at the federal level, led the company to make a “difficult” decision. The Senate recently failed to make good on the GOP’s years-long campaign promise to repeal the law known as Obamacare, and insurers say Trump has added to instability in the markets with threats to stop paying so-called cost-sharing reduction subsidies.”  (emphasis added)

The administration has several ways to sabotage the Affordable Care Act and failure to support the cost sharing reduction subsidies is one of the prime one.

Thanks Mr. Trump.

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