Category Archives: Nevada politics

Everybody Wants to Bargain: Nevada’s SB 158

gridlock

The intent of SB 158, currently being discussed in the Nevada Assembled Wisdom, is relatively apparent – make the provisions of collective bargaining agreements between local governments and teachers, firefighters, police and law enforcement personnel, etc. publicly available 10 days prior to the meeting during which the agreement is to be voted upon.

If I’m reading the current law correctly, such agreements must be part of a public meeting agenda, duly posted, and subject to all the rigmarole associated therewith.  A copy of the “supporting material” available to the board or commission is also to be made available to the public. [NRS 288.153].  So, why SB 158?  Time.  From three working days prior to the hearing to “ten days before the date of the hearing.”

Superficially speaking this might allow for more time for public commentary and consideration of the agreement or master contract.  Realistically speaking, there are very few interest groups which are enamored of plowing  through contractual language and financials – the negotiating committees from labor and management, and the “anti-government” organizations which delight in microscopically examining supporting materials for clues to how “over-time is being abused,” or how “teachers are overpaid and underworked.”

SB 158 clearly gives the latter a few extra days to gather opponents of the collectively agreed upon contract prior to the hearing.  School Board members and County Commissioners already know the contents – they’ve been scrutinizing them throughout the bargaining process.  Members of union negotiation committees already know the contents – they, too, have been engaged in the same proposal, counter-proposal, amended proposal, process as their counterparts across the table.

The object is always that the employer (Commission or Board) will give the most they can without jeopardizing the priorities of the government entity, and the employees’ representatives will accept as little as they can without having to face a truly unpleasant mass meeting session with their membership.  The bargaining process itself can be competitive without being combative.  When things get combative there are ways out of the bind – mediation and arbitration.  And, herein lies the problem with SB 158.

Let’s assume that both sides in a bargaining agreement between, say. the Firefighters and the City have been negotiating in good faith.  The city has been forthcoming about its revenue projections, and the firefighters have been rational in their wage breakdowns.   They discussed hours and working conditions along with other related matters in a rational way.  They’ve avoided mediation and arbitration processes by agreeing to a collectively bargained contract. Now, we come to the question – why do opponents of the agreement need those extra days to round up their forces prior to the meeting?

  • Is it that the opponents of the agreement don’t trust the negotiating team from the city, district, or county?
  • Is it that the opponents of the agreement want to scuttle any deal which includes a modification of hours, adjustments in working conditions, or increases in pay?
  • If the negotiations hit a hard patch, and mediation or arbitration has adjusted the proposed agreement, then do the opponents want to scuttle the decision of the mediator or arbiter?

If the “scuttle strategy” is in place and the anti-government types want extra time for their media releases, press conferences, and the like, then what we have is an instance of obstruction at a key moment – a moment in which the intentions of both sides (both labor and management) are questioned and if the strategy is successful they’re both back at the bargaining table – and not where they want to be, which is home for a nice evening with the families.  In other, less delicate terms, Gridlock.

Public employee union representatives and members of school boards, city councils, and county commissions have donated countless hours of their own time to bargain these agreements.  They’ve authored proposals, revised them, spoken to them, adjusted them, and agreed upon compromise positions, usually on their own time and their own resources.  In this they should be praised – and should not be subjected to more organized (often professional) opposition which seeks to shoot down their efforts with shots below their Plimpsol Lines.

The burden of proof is on the proponents of SB 158 to demonstrate that the posting and publication of materials associated with the bargaining efforts of labor and management in the public arena, must allow for extra days for the processing and analysis of those materials – and NOT merely more time for the professional nay-sayers to advance their own narrow agendas.

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Filling in the Potholes: Highway Funding Options

NV road construction funds

The Nevada Department of Transportation lists 13 current projects [NDOT] and the planning division suggests another round of major projects running from 2015 to 2018. [NDOT pdf]  This makes sense given that the population of Nevada in 1990 was 1.221 million, the population was 2.019 in 2000, and the population grew to an estimated 2.839 million as of 2014.  The problem, of course, is how to pay for the construction and maintenance of roads and highways to meet escalating population demands.  The current financial resources are explained by NDOT:

“State highways maintained by the Nevada Department of Transportation are financed with dedicated highway-user revenue and federal funds. No General Fund (general tax) revenue is used. State and federal highway funds are principally derived from vehicle fuel tax and registration fees.” [NDOT]

Clark and Washoe counties index their taxes to the price of fuel, a ballot measure in 2016 would make such indexing statewide, and this should be considered in the light of two factors. First, the relative volatility of fuel prices, and second, the increasing population of the State, up 132% since 1990. [LVSun]  So, where does the money come from?

“Figures compiled by The Associated Press show the total amount of money available to states from the Federal Highway Trust Fund has declined 3.5 percent during the five-year period ending in 2013, the latest year for which numbers were available. During that span, the amount of inflation-adjusted federal highway money dropped in all states except Alaska and New York.

In Nevada, the 6 percent drop from 2008 to 2013 comes in spite of a 41 percent increase from 2003 to 2013. At the same time, needs in Nevada are mounting. Current funding levels only provide 60 to 70 percent of what’s needed to maintain state highways, according to a recent report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers.” [LVSun]

The idea that current funding levels from both state and federal sources only meets 60 – 70% of our needs isn’t an appealing thought.  Could it be that the state might see more assistance from Federal sources?

“A temporary funding patch on highway funding is scheduled to expire in May and lawmakers in Congress have been at odds over a long-term plan. A federal fuel tax increase appears unlikely.” [LVSun]

We should note that the last time the Federal gasoline tax was increased was in 1993, when it was raised to 18.4 cents per gallon. [WaPo]  That was when the population of Nevada stood at approximately 1.411 million, and the price of a gallon of gasoline was about $1.16/gallon. Nevada’s state gasoline tax was 24 cents in 1993 and has dropped to 23.804 (-0.2%) as of 2014. [TPC pdf]

One of the obvious problems with pegging highway construction and maintenance financing to the price of a gallon of gas is that more fuel efficient cars on the road means fewer trips to the pump.  Another factor to consider is the increasing use of public transportation.  Indeed, in spite of the drop in fuel prices recently, national transit ridership figures are up. [NYT]  While increasing revenues from higher gasoline taxes would help resolve some immediate funding issues, the source is less robust than we might need in the long run.

As noted previously, AB 21 introduced in the Nevada Legislature as of December 20, 2014, calls for the issuance of ‘special obligation bonds’ for the financing of highway projects. Specifically, it allows for extending the maximum maturity from 20 to 30 years.  This, too, is problematic.  The extra ten years may allow for an extension of repayment schedules, but it also allows for the piling up of interest.  If the “coupon” on a transportation related bond is approximately 4.0% [MuniNV] then that extra 10 years could be rather expensive.

At compound interest rates, $10 million would end up costing about $21 million in 20 years, or about $32.4 million in 30 years. [MC] Even simple interest rates would add $8 million to the cost of a $10 million project at 20 years, and $12 million in 30.

There’s always the Throw Up Your Hands and Let Someone Else Do It Solution, i.e. Privatization.

“Another idea tossed around in the Legislature is high occupancy transit lanes — better known as toll roads. The fast lanes, aimed at reducing congestion, could be financed by a private company, which would own the lane and keep the toll revenue for a set period of time.

“We’re going to look to private industry to help us with some of our issues,” said Republican Assemblyman Jim Wheeler, who chairs the Assembly Transportation Committee.” [LVSun]

This, too, comes with some significant costs.  A few of these can be categorized under the general heading of “public control.” For example, how can taxpayers be assured of the implications of “non-compete” clauses? Must adjacent municipalities add traffic lights and decrease speed limits in order to guarantee usage rates (i.e. toll revenues) for privatized roadways or access lanes?  Is the state required to agree to compensation clauses which demand that the state pay the investors if it adds an exit ramp or other fixture which might reduce toll revenues?  What of the effects of clauses which seek to divert traffic to the toll lanes or roads? For example, if a state were to contract with a private corporation for a toll road it might agree to 4.5% of the revenue if the speed limit were set at 45 mph, or 9% if it agreed to set the limit at 60 mph?  What implications might that have for public safety and general transportation policy? [PIRG pdf]

There’s also the old business adage to consider: You can’t control what you don’t own.  This leads to more questions.  Does the contract require that the private corporation adopt the best practices and most modern maintenance standards?  Will the state get what it is due?  Again, if the contract is for 99 years and the investors are assured they’ll get their returns in 20, then is the state actually losing money on the deal?  When speaking of long term contracts, it’s also important to consider how long the contract should last.  It’s not only difficult to value projects over a 50 year period, it’s also a iffy proposition to determine if that 50 years is too much to give away to private corporations. [PIRG pdf]

Sometimes, getting things done “on the cheap” can lead to more problems than the initial ‘solution’ intended.

There are other ideas we might want to consider:

#1. Take some of the pressure off the road/highway system by improving options for public transit.  If congestion is causing havoc in some urban areas, consider light rail or bus transport to ease the problems.  Some consideration might be given to comparative costs involved in installing options from funding sources other than the highway funds, and providing the public with transit choices other than using private cars. This could be especially useful in crowded urban areas.

#2. Give some consideration to options other than in 10 year intervals for special obligation bonds. If the costs are increased with a 20 year bond, then they’d be less at 25 than they would be at 30.

#3.  Consider the current structure of Nevada’s vehicle registration fees, some of which are earmarked for transportation needs. 

There are no magic solutions, no silver bullets, when it comes to addressing public infrastructure projects like roads and highways.  What is needed is some careful study of the implications of transportation policy with an eye towards Nevada’s future population trends, projected revenues, and estimated capacity to pay for long term projects.

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Filed under gasoline prices, highways, Infrastructure, Nevada economy, Nevada politics

Pistol Packing Mama’s Baking Soda Solution

Fiore 2

The Wisdom of Michele Fiore (R-NV Assembly 4) might be amusing if (1) it stayed within the boundaries of the Silver State as an inside joke, or (2) if much of it was within the realm of reality.  Neither appears to be the case.

Think Progress has picked up the latest Fiore Story, as has MSNBC.  Thus much for keeping the story to ourselves.

However, there’s more to this adventure into an alternate reality.  First, the suggestion that campus rape might be prevented if the “hot little girls” were packing pistols in their purses ignores some valid questions.

First question, if all the girls are allowed to carry firearms on campus, would that not also apply to the men – the potential predators stalking the “hot little girls?” And, if this is the case then what we have is a formula for escalating violence not necessarily prevention.  Secondly, the incidence of rape among college women is far below that for non-college females. Ergo, while any rape isn’t acceptable the fact that college women aren’t carrying firearms doesn’t put them at necessarily greater risk.  Third, there’s the incapacitation factor.  Campus rapes tend to be associated with physical restraint, and/or voluntary or involuntary intoxication.  The gun in the purse under these circumstances probably wouldn’t be an option. [USAT]

Secondly, there’s the long debunked cancer treatment advice.  “If you have cancer, which I believe is a fungus, and we can put a pic line into your body and we’re flushing with, say, salt water, sodium cardonate through that line and flushing out the fungus. These are some procedures that are not FDA-approved in America that are very inexpensive, cost-effective.” [Ralston]

The American Cancer Society’s position is crystal clear on this matter:

“No peer-reviewed articles in medical journals were found to support the theory that cancer is caused by a fungus infection or a yeast infection. Available peer-reviewed medical journals do not support claims that sodium bicarbonate works as a cancer treatment in humans.”

So, where did the baking soda idea come from? Assuming Fiore meant “sodium bicarbonate.”

“The main proponent of sodium bicarbonate as an alternative cancer treatment is Tullio Simoncini, MD. Information on the Internet describes how Dr. Simoncini concluded that cancer is caused by Candida albicans and can be cured with baking soda. The sequence of events and timeline are not described in detail.

According to the Cancer Treatment Watch website, “[Dr. Simoncini] has been using unsubstantiated cancer treatments for 15 years… in 2003, his [Italian] license to practice medicine was withdrawn, and in 2006 he was convicted by an Italian judge for wrongful death and swindling… [ACS]

Now we have the specter of a bill introduced into our Assembled Wisdom promoting “alternative” treatments such as one practiced by a defrocked Italian doctor who’s been convicted of wrongful death and swindling.

Perhaps we can only hope (1) that Assemblywoman Fiore manages to stay out of the media spotlight long enough for us to catch our breath before the next foray into insanity, and (2) her health and welfare advice is ignored long enough to prevent escalating violence on campuses, and to prevent cancer patients from suffering the fraudulent attentions of defrocked quacks.

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How NOT to finance public works: The Capital Appreciation Bond Saga

Capital appreciation bonds God help school board members. They don’t get paid for their service, and they certainly aren’t compensated for the bombastic late night calls from irate parents when Little Fauntleroy isn’t selected for the lead in the annual 5th grade play.  That said, let’s explore one more reason for them to go gray while doing their civic duty: Swimming with Financial Sharks.

In late 2012 the Los Angeles Times reported that approximately 200 California school districts and community colleges had been talked into Capital Appreciation Bonds which promised to mitigate the problems associated with financing school construction costs. So, what could go wrong?

“CABs, as the bonds are known, allow schools to borrow large sums without violating state or locally imposed caps on property taxes, at least in the short term. But the lengthy delays in repayment increase interest expenses, in some cases to as much as 10 or 20 times the amount borrowed.”

Only, it wasn’t 10 or 20 times the amount borrowed – given the $500 billion borrowed could turn into $2 trillion in future repayments.

“Wall Street exploited the school boards’ lack of business acumen and proposed the bonds as blank checks written against taxpayers’ pocketbooks. One school administrator described a Wall Street meeting to discuss the system as like “swimming with the big sharks.”

Wall Street has preyed on these school boards because of the millions of dollars in commissions. Banks, financial advisers and credit rating firms have billed California public entities almost $400 million since 2007. Lockyer described this as “part of the ‘new’ Wall Street,” which “has done this kind of thing on the private investor side for years, then the housing market and now its public entities.” [SF.com]

This was lucrative business for such firms as Piper Jaffray, which pocketed some  $31.4 million in fees for brokering 165 CAB deals, or for Goldman Sachs which earned $1.6 million for a single deal in San Diego. [SF.com]

The argument in favor of Capital Appreciation Bonds is deceptively simple.  Most bond issues have steady repayment schedules and are limited to 30 years or less.   Capital Appreciation Bonds assume that the asset will appreciate in value or generate revenue for longer than 30 years or less – so, why not spread out the repayment schedule over a longer period? Here’s why, and here are two things to watch as the sharks circle:

(1) Watch for interestingly engineered estimates of future revenues.  If you are looking at property values that are expected to increase exponentially, then imagine the shark grin facing in your direction.  “Gee,” sayeth the Shark, “The recession can’t last forever, and property values will increase. Therefore, why not spread your borrowing costs over a longer period when you’ll be generating larger incomes?”

(2) Watch for the piling up of fees and interest.  Yes, the repayment schedules were such that school districts in California could construct gyms, classrooms, and other facilities that couldn’t get past voter disapproval of bond issues – but as with all loans the longer the repayment schedule the more interest will be paid. For example, the Savanna School District (Anaheim) took on $239,721 in CAB obligations in 2009 on which it will pay approximately $3.6 million by the 2034 maturity date. [Alter]  There are, unfortunately, other examples in Orange County, CA:

“Over the next 40 years, these bonds are projected to cost districts $2 billion as they repay them at rates of 1.1 times to 15 times the principal, according to figures provided by the state treasurer’s office. Conventional bonds typically carry a 2-to-1 or 3-to-1 debt ratio.” [OCR]

It’s entirely possible to call for more infrastructure construction and asset enhancement without having the specter of the Capital Appreciation Bond salesman showing all fifteen rows of teeth in each jaw.  We should also call this kind of dealing what it is – predatory lending.  The Roosevelt Institute provides a summary:

“The financialization of the United States economy has distorted our social, economic, and political priorities. Cities and states across the country are forced to cut essential community services because they are trapped in predatory municipal finance deals that cost them millions of dollars every year. Wall Street and other big corporations engaged in a systematic effort to suppress taxes, making it difficult for cities and states to advance progressive revenue solutions to properly fund public services. Banks take advantage of this crisis that they helped create by targeting state and local governments with predatory municipal finance deals, just like they targeted cash-strapped homeowners with predatory mortgages during the housing boom. Predatory financing deals prey upon the weaknesses of borrowers, are characterized by high costs and high risks, are typically overly complex, and are often designed to fail.” [RooseveltInst]

High cost, high risk, overly complex, and sold to the school boards as a way to finance capital projects without breaking the “no new taxes” pledges.  The thought of paying out at 15:1 when the debt costs should have been no more than 3:1 is possibly worse than the ranting of Fauntleroy’s mother after the 5th grade play cast was announced. And so we come to the camel’s nose into Nevada’s tent with a recommendation for infrastructure funding:

“Along these same lines, there may be instances where changing legislatively imposed requirements relating to bonding may benefit from increased flexibility. For instance, bonds for capital projects are generally limited to terms of less than 30 years. However, in a limited number of cases, such as projects which generate user fees or for which the useful life of the asset extends beyond 30 years, there may be instances where longer financing terms may be useful to accelerating the timeline of a needed capital project.” [Applied Analysis]

What is Applied Analysis (client list includes Chambers of Commerce) recommending?  “More flexibility” in bonding requirements? This sounds ominously like California’s infamous AB 1388 which launched the CAB craze in our western neighbor.  Lengthen the repayment period to the life of the asset? The average functional life of a school building is 40 years. [NCES] So, a capital appreciation bond could be issued for 40 years – go back to the unfortunate example of the Poway School District, wherein borrowing $150 million ended up costing $1 billion.

School board members, as well as city and county officials, should approach suggestions that they want “more flexibility” and “longer repayment schedules” with exactly the same trepidation they’d approach the water when the shark alert sign goes up.

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Home Defects, Budget Shortfalls, and Picking Losers

Jig Saw Puzzle

Interesting items, each worthy of a post, but in the interest of keeping up to date – here are some newsworthy items deserving of a click and read.

Nevada Legislature: Take a moment to read Eli Segall’s piece in the Las Vegas Sun about the interest taken in the Assembled Wisdom about homeowner complaints in regard to construction defects.  Here’s a taste:

“Supporters say the proposal will boost construction jobs, but outside analysts say it will hammer trial lawyers, a political and business foe of builders, and, despite the bill’s name, will make it harder for homeowners to sue for shoddy workmanship.”  Why?

“As proposed, AB 125 would, among other things, strip homeowners’ ability to recover reasonable attorney fees in defect cases; require homeowners to state each problem in “specific detail” rather than in “reasonable” detail as current law allows and to give the defects’ “exact” locations in the house; and change the definition of a constructional defect, eliminating the provision that such flaws are made in violation of law and local codes and ordinances.”

Republicans in Disarray?  There is an effort to recall Assemblyman Hambrick (R-NVAD2).  Hambrick, GOP opponents say, has Strayed From the No New Taxes Pledge. [LVRJ]

School Daze: There’s this from Let’s Talk Nevada:

“8:00 AM: H/T Ralston for this. Pedro Martinez, the man Governor Brian Sandoval (R) hand-picked to run the new “Achievement School District” where he wants to transfer 10% of Nevada public schools into, is so dedicated to improving public education in Nevada… That he’s now running for School Superintendent in Boston. And yes, that’s Boston, Massachusetts.”

Meanwhile in Wisconsin under the Austerity/Trickle Down Hoax regime of Scott Walker – the governor’s solution to the $283 million budget shortfall created by his tax cuts is to skip $108 million in debt paymentsAnd in Kansas, the legislature backed down and decided to allow governor Brownback to sweep $475 million over the next two years from KDOT into the budget hole created by his tax cuts. [Kansas.comGet ready Ohio, governor Kasich is gearing up his 23% cut in the state income taxes over the next two years.

And in Congress, the Republican leadership is operating on the same theme:

“House leaders plan to schedule votes this week on seven bills recently approved by the Ways and Means Committee to make permanent an array of “tax extenders,” a set of primarily corporate tax provisions that policymakers routinely extend for a year or two at a time.  The seven measures, which will likely be packaged into a smaller number of bills for floor consideration, are the first installment in a series of bills that House leaders are expected to move to make many of the largest tax extenders permanent, while offsetting none of the cost.”

I think we’ve seen this before, and labeling it “Credit Card Capitalism,” wherein the Bush Administration turned the Clinton Administration surplus into a massive deficit – and then blamed the Democrats for “tax and spend” policies.  We might get the drift – the Republicans get into control, lower the taxes and revenues, thereby piling up a massive debt. The Democrats take back the control, enact taxes to fill the holes in the state budgets – and the GOP screams about “Tax and Spend?”

About those “economic development” and “job creating” ideas – a report (pdf) from North Carolina documents that 60% of the recipients of their incentive awards were cancelled because the firms failed to live up to their promises. H/T Angry Bear.  The story is about the same in Wisconsin:

“The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, a public-private body set up by Walker shortly after he took office in January 2011, was supposed to help the state climb out of recession by shedding bureaucratic rules and drawing on private-sector expertise.

But the WEDC has fallen short of its own goals by tens of thousands of jobs and failed to keep track of millions of dollars it has handed out. One reason for the agency’s disappointing performance: Walker’s overhaul of the state bureaucracy drove away seasoned development workers, economic development experts who work closely with the agency told Reuters.” [CapBlue]

There are other ways to create jobs and improve our economy; take a look at the CAP proposal for the Appalachian region.

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Filed under Economy, Nevada legislature, Nevada politics, tax revenue, Taxation

Guns and Nutters: Nevada Legislature Recoils

Guns Nevada Legis Infrastructure

The state of Nevada has 158 “high hazard” dams.  ‘High hazard’ means there could be loss of life or significant property damage if a dam failure were to occur. [ASCE]  However, the state legislature appears to have other priorities. Guns, case in point:   SB 175.  As of February 4, 2015 there were 10 bills in the Assembled Wisdom regarding guns. [RGJ]  SB 175 is particularly subservient to the National Rifle (Manufacturers) Association:

“Senate Bill 175, introduced by Senate Majority Leader Michael Roberson, R-Henderson, also would loosen Nevada’s reciprocity laws with other states regarding concealed weapon permits and repeal a handgun registration requirement in Clark County, a local ordinance that has been in existence for more than six decades.

Further, it would establish “state control over the regulation of policies concerning firearms,” and allow anyone “adversely affected” by local ordinances or regulations that violate the measure to sue for damages.

The measure would make it illegal for anyone convicted of domestic violence, even a misdemeanor offense, from owning a gun. A violation would constitute a felony. It also would prohibit anyone under an extended protection order from acquiring a gun while the order is in effect.” [LVRJ]

Part One – the reciprocity would lower Nevada standards to the least common denominator among the states. Part Two – repeals the permitting requirements in Clark County. Part Three – allows anyone with a grouse to sue local governments on the grounds of “2nd Amendment Free-dumb.” Part Four – says a person under a domestic violence restraining order cannot buy a gun – and says nothing about removing guns from an abuser who already has possession of them prior to conviction.  Meanwhile, …

The state’s budget for dealing with high hazard dams is half the national average, and there are only 3 full time employees responsible for overseeing an average of  225 state regulated dams.   [ASCE]  Nevada ranks 23rd in the nation in renewable energy in a state well known for sun and wind.  [ASCE]

However, those dams and that renewable energy aren’t major topics among the Assembled Wisdom because the efforts thus far highlight how a gun hobbyist in Nevada can get a concealed carry permit as easily as he or she could in Florida – wherein the standard appears to be the capacity to slightly fog a mirror. [TP]  Witness: AB 127 which would do away with local Clark County firearms regulation and put all the authority in the hands of the State.  [LVRJ]  I must be getting very forgetful in my dotage, but I do recall a time when Republicans were all about “local control.”

The state could use more funds for its educational system, both k-12 and higher education; more funding for its public health programs; more resources for our mental health and child welfare services – and more resources allocated to improving our infrastructure.  But, the prime topic in this rendition of the Assembled Wisdom seems to be the care and nurturing of our ‘beleaguered ammosexuals.’   Because, you know… Freedumb.

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Nevada AB 121: Promote Your Gun in School

NVLeg Gun Promotion

Nevada Assembly members Wheeler, Ellison, Jones, Dickman, Moore, O’Neill, and Oscarson would like to help those kiddies who are disciplined for simulating a firearm during art or play activities, or who are wearing Pro-Gun Apparel in Assembly Bill 121.

There are a couple of levels at which this is ill advised. First, it seems to be one of those solutions in search of a problem. Someone’s kid gets disciplined in some school somewhere for simulating a lethal weapon, gets sent home, and the incident seems to instantly hit the Internet – to be endlessly forwarded and all too often enhanced by the Great E-Mail Telegraph. 

Secondly, this isn’t all about ‘free-dumb.’ It’s about marketing. It’s about the National Rifle (Manufacturers) Association promoting its products to a younger generation – since the older ones don’t seem all that interested in arming themselves to the gunwales.   There are reactive increases in gun sales, but generally speaking there are fewer US households purchasing more guns while the majority eschew such shopping.

It’s about the continuing efforts of the National Rifle (Manufacturers) Association to re-interpret the 2nd Amendment to disallow any common sense restraints and limitations, as are applied to every other portion of the Splendid Document.  

It’s also a way to launch a thousand ships of controversy. Does Johnny’s t-shirt with the scantily clad voluptuous young woman waving a 2nd Amendment banner constitute a “disruption,” or because it’s advertising the NRA agenda is it OK? After all, under the provisions of AB 121 a child can’t be disciplined for  “Wearing clothing or accessories that depict a firearm or dangerous weapon or express an opinion regarding a constitutional right to keep and bear arms. “

We might ask – are some of the people who are advocating in favor of this bill possibly be  the same folks who decried the wearing of “Hands Up Don’t Shoot” shirts worn by some professional, amateur, and school team members? Have they agreed with the Oklahoma legislator who wanted to ban hoodies?  Would an NRA hoodie, as seen above, be acceptable?

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Filed under Gun Issues, Nevada legislature, Nevada politics