Famous Mysteries for the GOP to solve instead of wasting time on Clinton trivia!

Yes, we’ve all noticed that when the Mueller investigation inches closer to the inner portions of the White House, or when Congressional investigators begin interviewing interesting characters involved in the Russian assault on our 2016 elections, or when there are more indications that various investigations are “following the money” until it is exchanged for rubles — it’s time for <insert drum roll> the Republicans to investigate <insert drum roll> Hillary Clinton!   This round it’s the “uranium” business, long debunked, and the “emails” a tedious tale of sound and fury signifying nothing.  Not even Shakespeare himself could wring a plot out of these two.

So, in the interest of having the GOP leadership in Congress find something actually useful to do, here are some famous mysteries they could investigate.

Judge Crater Disappears!

On August 6, 1930 Judge Joseph Force Crater went missing.

“His law clerk later reported that, on the morning of August 6, the judge destroyed various documents, moved several portfolios of papers to his Fifth Avenue apartment and arranged for $5,000 to be withdrawn from his bank account. That evening, he left his office, bought a ticket to the Broadway comedy “Dancing Partner” and shared a meal with his lawyer friend William Klein and a showgirl named Sally Lou Ritz at a Manhattan chophouse. His dining companions claimed they last saw Crater walking down the street outside the restaurant, presumably on his way to attend the play.”

The NY judge wasn’t seen again.  There was talk that he’d been buried on what’s now the site of the NY Aquarium. Author Peter Quinn suggested one solution in “The Man Who Never Returned.”   However, the case remains officially unsolved. Since the GOP appears to love old, cold, cases how about one that’s now 87 years old?

The Black Dahlia

A mystery not quite so long in the tooth as Judge Crater, but still a viable candidate for GOP research.  It was 1947 when the body of 22 year old Elizabeth Short was discovered in a empty Los Angeles lot.  The case is now 70 years old, but perhaps the GOP could solve it in time for a 75th anniversary?  There were some fairly credible allegations made in 2013 attributing the murder to Dr. George Hodel, but conclusive proof has never been offered.  The case is still old, and cold, and would surely interest the public far more than some recycled Fox News hyperbole and hysteria?

Amelia Earhart in the Wild Blue Yonder?

If a 70 year old case isn’t appealing, how about an 80 year old one?   The National Geographic has done some preliminaries for an investigative framework, presenting the top three theories explaining her 1937 disappearance.  Somewhere between the “open ocean crash” theory, and the “Nikumaroro Castaway” theory,  and the “Marshall Islands Conspiracy” theory, there should be plenty for the Republicans to investigate, evaluate, analyze, and squabble about — all  without treating the American public to even less credible conspiracy theories.

What brought down the Post and Rogers flight?

Famous aviation pioneer Wiley Post and humorist/actor Will Rogers crashed and died during their exploration flight near Point Barrow, AK August 15, 1935.  This has all the elements the Republicans should love.  First, was it the old ‘pilot error’ version of tragic events?  Or, was it that Post had cobbled together too many parts from too many aircraft to construct a viable airplane?  Was it carburetor icing? Or some other mechanical explanation?  Or, perhaps it could have been a lack of patience on the part of the two?  And, just so we can add an element of ‘relevance’ to the problems — what were Post and Rogers doing exploring Alaska and Russia?

Surely amongst the Judge, the Aspiring Actress, and the Aviators, the GOP can find something of interest to occupy their curiosity?   It would certainly be a relief from their interminable obsession with the former Secretary of State.   We can only hope.

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The Trump Swamp and Its Creatures

Health and Human Services Secretary Price is gone.  Gone in the wake turbulence of the BillionAir issue, to the tune of at least $400,000 in charter air travel [WaPo] taken in the period between his confirmation (2/10/17) and September 29, 2017.  There was also the not so small matter of the $500,000 in travel expenses he racked up flying on military aircraft.  Roughly calculating, Price ran up about $100,000 per month in travel costs.  Speculation continues about his successor. [Axios]  Interestingly enough one name on the list is VA Secretary Shulkin.

Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin has his own BillionAir problem.  This past July the Secretary took a ten day trip to Europe, in part to confer on veterans’ issues with British and Danish officials — but there seemed to have been plenty of time for the Secretary to attend the Wimbledon Ladies’ Finals, visit four palaces, take some guided tours and other tourist ventures. [WaPo]

Secretary of the Treasury Stephen Mnuchin’s travels also qualify him for the BillionAir Club.  The Secretary’s travel includes some $800,000 worth of travel on military aircraft [NYT] and this on seven flights.  His request for a military flight to go on his honeymoon was withdrawn.  Who wouldn’t want a military flight to go witness the solar eclipse?

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke is a junior member of the BillionAir Club.  There was that $12,000+ flight taken on an oil executive’s aircraft, a flight between two points which are served by commercial airlines.  How nice.  Additionally, the Las Vegas portion of the travel was to speak to a sports team owned by one of his donors. [WaPo] How convenient.  Did we mention his flag? The “Buckingham Palace” version of “transparency?”  Did we mention those guys in Whitefish who got a major contract to help Puerto Rico with its power generation and transmission problem?

Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross may not be a member of the BillionAir Club, but he does have some issues remembering what assets he has and where he’s stashed them. Forbes magazine tried to untangle the threads and indicated that it would truly be remarkable if Ross had managed to make a clean transfer of some $2 Billion, (yes, that’s billion) in assets into a trust account.  Ethics specialists have some of the same questions.

Administrator of the EPA Scott Pruitt is a candidate for the BillionAir Club, with his $58,000 in flight costs for four noncommercial and military flights. [WaPo]  Mr. Pruitt has garnered enough (number unspecified) death threats to cause his security costs to increase to about $2 million annually, additionally there’s the $16,000 security system, and the $25,000 ‘sound proof’ communications room (the Agency already has a secure communications facility.) [Ind]  These people are really high maintenance.

This isn’t normal.  It is not normal to have six members of a Cabinet in the first term with serious ethics issues, outrageous travel expenses, and remarkable agency expenses.  Yes, two Republican Senators have announced their retirement, but retirement from the fray won’t fix this problem.    Some very serious Congressional oversight is necessary to pull the reins on the BillionAir Club and the administrative expenses.  If the GOP wants to retain the mantle of a fiscally conservative, fiscally responsible, party then actions need to speak much louder than words.

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Tax Cuts, Wages, and Promises, Promises, Promises

GD income wages salaries tax cuts 1980 2017

That Blue Line on the chart is FRED’s report of gross domestic income, in terms of compensation for employees (wages and salaries) from 1980 to the present.  One of the things to notice is that it keeps rising.  We can explain part of this by taking inflation into account, and some of the bumps and blips by noting that the shaded gray sections represent recessions.  But, it just keeps going up except for the Great Recession brought to us in the wake of the Housing Bubble/Wall Street Casino Crash, compliments of the Wall Street Casino.

Indeed, notice that increase in employees wages and salaries between 1990 and 2000, when the top marginal tax rate increased from 31% to 39.6%, the blue line keeps going upward.   If nothing else, the graphic above illustrates that anyone trying to convince us that increases or decreases in the top marginal rate for income tax payers correlate to increases or decreases in wage and salary compensation trends hasn’t been paying attention.

The Corporate Tax Wrinkle 

Okay, if one can’t make the case that tax cuts for the wealthy won’t “increase” the money in the pockets of middle income Americans, then there’s the Corporate Tax Wrinkle.  Thus, the White House is trying this line:

“The Council of Economic Advisers report argues that high corporate taxes hurt workers in the form of smaller paychecks and that worker incomes rise sharply when corporate rates fall. It points to “the deteriorating relationship between wages of American workers and U.S. corporate profits” and says, essentially, that high corporate taxes have encouraged companies to shift capital abroad rather than flow profits to workers through pay increases.”

Here’s the first problem — this statement assumes that high corporate taxes cause companies to “shift capital abroad.”  This conveniently ignores some other reasons corporations seek to invest overseas.  Let’s make a quick list: (1) There’s good old fashioned market seeking.  In this case the company is looking for new customers for its goods or services, and it may be that the domestic market is fairly well saturated so looking abroad makes perfect sense.  This is especially true for technology firms which often find that the smallest market needed to drive development is larger than some of the largest national markets.  (2)  Resource seeking.  Labor costs may be cheaper in another foreign market, or there may be quicker access to natural resources in a foreign location.  (3) Strategy.  Imagine that a corporation is looking to improve its distribution network, or to take advantage of new technologies; a company might decide to partner with a foreign corporation which specializes in some specific phase of production.  And then there are (4) Efficiency elements.  We can insert some common elements into this category like trade agreements which give an advantage to plant or service locations because of tariff agreements, or there could be currency exchange rate considerations involved.

Therefore, we can quickly see that the corporate tax environment is a part of the decision making process about shifting capital overseas, but it certainly isn’t the only factor, and it may not even be the most important one.  What the White House Wrinkle demands is that we believe if Congress reduces corporate taxes this will offset all the other other reasons a corporation may want to shift some of its operations overseas.  Frankly, this really isn’t rational.

And, then there’s the second problem —  hoarding.

“The cash held overseas by US firms has continued to grow at a rapid pace, rising to almost $2.5tn in 2015. The substantial tax bill most firms would face if they attempted to bring this cash home, however, means that it is still very unlikely to ever be repatriated under the current system.”

Gee, if we could “repatriate” all this money imagine the increase in wages!  Not. So. Fast. The firms stashing the most cash overseas are Apple, Microsoft, Cisco, Alphabet (Google), and Oracle. [MW]  Right off the bat we notice that these are all tech firms, and as mentioned above tech firms are constantly market and resource seeking — while a repatriation scheme may bring some of the cash home, there’s still a reason the firms may want to keep capital available for foreign operations; it wouldn’t matter what domestic tax system was in place.

Another point that should be made more often is that this money isn’t “trapped” overseas.   Where are these “deferred profits?

“A 2010 survey of 27 large U.S. multinationals found nearly half of their “overseas” tax-deferred profits were invested in U.S. assets, including U.S. dollars deposited in U.S. banks or invested in U.S. Treasury bonds or other U.S. government securities, securities and bonds issued by U.S. corporations, and U.S. mutual funds and stocks.”

What’s “trapped” are the tax payments due on the funds — not the funds themselves, 50% of which are already happily running along in the corporate revenue streams or “reinvested” in U.S. assets.   And if we could “bring home”  (or get out of the bank) the other half would this mean higher wages?  Remember, we tried this once before:

“In 2004, lawmakers allowed multinationals to repatriate more than $300 billion in profits at a greatly reduced tax rate. But independent studies largely conclude that firms used those profits to pay cash to shareholders, not to invest or create U.S. jobs. In fact, many firms laid off large numbers of U.S. workers even while reaping multi-billion-dollar tax cuts. Today, offshore profits are concentrated in a few large multinationals that have recently made record cash payouts to shareholders by buying back stock, showing that they already have enough cash on hand to make whatever investments they project would be profitable. Repatriated profits would likely similarly be paid out to shareholders, not invested.”

Who are those “buyback monsters” who’ve been demonstrating they already have enough cash on hand to make any investments they think might create even more profits?   Apple is one, then there’s Exxon Mobil, IBM, General Electric, Pfizer, and McDonald’s. [CNBC]  If Apple is one of the ‘monsters,’ then why would anyone believe that allowing the tech giant to “repatriate” more money at reduced tax rates would make them do anything other than what they’ve been doing — using the capital to buyback stock?  McDonald’s?  If they have enough cash on hand to indulge in financial engineering to increase their stock prices, what would make anyone believe they’d change midstream and start advocating for raising the minimum wage?

Mythological Means

It’s really hard to imagine where that $4,000 pay raise is supposed to come from if corporations are given more tax breaks.  There’s a question of the provenance of that $4,000 number in the first place, and in the second place it’s a dubious estimate at best.  We should also notice that the claim isn’t being framed in context; there may be some gains for employees BUT they are long term, certainly not short-term or annual gains. [FC]

“It’s important to note that any gain to workers would only come in the long term — over several years. Furthermore, most households would not see a gain as large as the “average” or mean figure, which is pulled up by very high incomes of a relative few. In 2016, the average household income was $83,143 as we’ve already noted, but the median or midpoint for household income was $59,039, meaning that half of all households received less.”  [FC]

This is another version of the old story:  The Sultan of Brunei walks into a room with nine members of the Little Sisters of the Poor and the average (mean) wage skyrockets.  Take that $4,000 figure with a couple of boxes of Morton’s Salt.

The Bottom Line 

So, what do we know?  We know that there’s no direct correlation between low top marginal rates for individual filers and wage increases.  We know that corporations make decisions about off shore operations for a variety of reasons, taxes being only part of the equation.  We know that corporations have several options for investing cash (foreign or domestic) only one of which — seemingly the least likely — is to pay increased wages and salaries.  We know that corporations use “financial engineering” to increase their stock value, or increase dividends to their shareholders.  We know that even accepting the 20-25% labor liability for corporate taxation the returns to labor are long (not short or annual) term benefits of little value in terms of household budgeting; it’s NOT like having any useful amount of “cash in your pocket.”

In short, we probably know what we’ve suspected all along.  The current Republican version of “tax reform” is simply a gift to corporations, extremely wealthy persons, and a nice gesture from the Haves to the Have Mores.

And for this we are to accept cuts in Medicare to the tune of $472.9 billion over the next ten years, between $1 and $1.5 trillion in cuts to Medicaid, cuts to food assistance programs, cuts to low income heating assistance programs, cuts to children’s health insurance, cuts to education, small business support, and Meals on Wheels….

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William Blake Has Something To Say To The Current US Administration?

Cruelty has a Human Heart
And Jealousy a Human Face
Terror the Human Form Divine
And Secrecy, the Human Dress
The Human Dress, is forged Iron
The Human Form, a fiery Forge.
The Human Face, a Furnace seal’d
The Human Heart, its hungry Gorge.
(—William Blake)

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New Bull, Same Old Product: The Latest Incarnation of GOP Tax Cuts

For some reason, probably known but to the major donors of the Republican Party, “we” need a tax cut.  The rationale for this exercise echos the ubiquitous adolescent argument for automobile ownership — I need the car to go to work, I need to work to pay for the car.   In this instance, it’s argued that we need the tax cut to promote growth, and the growth to pay for the tax cut.  It’s the same old southbound product of a northbound male bovine we’ve heard so many times before.

Even the GOP assertions connect to this circuitous argument.  A tax cut, we are told, will promote economic growth — and Everyone will win.  Unfortunately, there’s no unanimous jury decision on this question.  First, there are some common methodological problems with altogether too many academic studies purporting to answer the question definitively.  Secondly, there are further issues intrinsic to discussion about how the tax cuts are to be offset.  Not all tax cut/reform proposals are created equal.

“The results suggest that not all tax changes will have the same impact on growth. Reforms that improve incentives, reduce existing subsidies, avoid windfall gains, and avoid deficit financing will have more auspicious effects on the long-term size of the economy, but may also create trade-offs between equity and efficiency.” [Gale, Brookings]

Therefore, if we step back and adopt the centrist conclusions of the Gale-Samwick Study quoted above, there appear to be some boxes to be checked off if the goal is to encourage long term economic growth, and one of those boxes calls for the avoidance of deficit financed tax cuts.

We are cautioned by Republican advocates that there are only two ways to reduce a federal deficit, either raise taxes or reduce spending.  The last iteration of a Republican tax cut, was not only deficit financed but the deficit was enhanced by the spending associated with the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.  Since raising revenue by increasing taxation is anathema to Republican orthodoxy then there must be a reduction in spending.  Enter the proposals from the current Republicans to reduce Medicare spending by $472.9 billion over the next decade, and a further reduction of $1 to $1.5 trillion in cuts to the Medicaid program.

The current FY 2018 budget makes some assumptions which may be quickly frustrated. For example, the budget assumes no further military conflicts — the military expenditures assume readiness costs, not military operations; and, cuts to domestic expenditures  to a level not seen since the Hoover Administration.

If this sounds like the same old prescriptions from GOP decades past, there’s a reason for it which becomes obvious when the framework is examined.  What we have herein is NOT a new proposal for tax reform, but a recycling of ideas included in every recent Republican tax plan.

Cut the corporate tax rate from 35% to 20%.  As noted previously in this site,  there are several options available to corporations, none of which have anything to do with increasing employment or raising wages — share buybacks, dividend payments, mergers and acquisitions, corporate bonuses, management compensation, etc.  The GOP argument rests on the fluid assumption that corporations will reward the nation with more plant expansion, research and development, and rising wages — without a scintilla of proof this will actually happen.

The 25% (15%) pass through rate.  This purports to be a bonus for small businesses.  In the real world most small businesses are already paying this rate or rates even lower.  Consider the following evaluation of the Pass Through business:

“Finally, the top statutory rates and average effective rates mask substantial differences in what individual business owners pay in taxes. Most businesses are small, earn relatively modest income, and thus face relatively low bracket rates. As a result, more than 85 percent of pass-through businesses in 2014 faced a top rate of 25 percent or less; only 3 percent faced a marginal rate greater than 30 percent (Figure 6).[10] However, a much larger share of pass-through income does face high marginal income tax rates. Almost half of pass-through income in 2014 came from businesses with a top rate of at least 35 percent.  In other words, a small number of large pass-throughs are responsible for the vast majority of the sector’s tax burden.”  (emphasis added)

Consumer Warning: Beware of muddled conflation of pass through taxation with income from pass through businesses.  85% of small businesses are already paying low pass through rates, and the income is coming from a small number of very wealthy pass through businesses.  It doesn’t take too much imagination to figure out these are lobby shops, law firms, and other wealthy operations which bear little resemblance to small law offices and other independent businesses.

The Death Tax is Coming, The Death Tax is Coming.  I have no reason to believe that there won’t be one more “small business owner,” or one more family farmer, hauled into camera range at a GOP function who will have some tale of woe about inheritance taxation — or as I prefer to call it: The Paris Hilton Legacy Protection Act.   99.8% of all Americans don’t have to pay the estate tax, and such taxes as are paid are 40% of the excess above $5.45 million.   One other point might be made at this point, it’s not the heirs who pay the estate taxation if any is due — it’s the estate, via the executors.  But the major number here is 99.8%, the 99.8% of Americans who will see absolutely no benefit from this “tax cut” at all.

Eliminating the Alternative Minimum Tax, “which is intended to ensure that higher-income people who take large amounts of deductions and other tax breaks pay at least a minimum level of tax.”   Now, gee, if I could just see a certain President’s tax returns I could tell if he were liable for the AMT?  If I could be reassured that high profile NYC real estate developers, who take a spectacular range of deductions, might have to pay the Alternative Minimum Tax so they aren’t dodging their contributions almost entirely?  However, it’s been since May 20, 2014 since a certain presidential candidate said that if he decided to run for high office he’d release his tax returns — some 1,313 days ago…

In short, there’s nothing new here. It’s the same old south bound produce of a north bound bull.  Repackaged, with a new face in the Oval Office, and I remain convinced that two of our Congressional representatives, Senator Dean Heller and Representative Mark Amodei, will happily twist themselves into rhetorical knots trying to explain how cutting Medicare and Medicaid will benefit middle income Nevadans by pleasing the millionaires and billionaires among us.

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Real Nevadans Real Numbers Real Income

The big push of the week appears to be that the Republicans have in mind a “middle class tax cut.”  Notice please that we’re not getting all that much in the way of “tax reform” but we are poised to get a deficit financed tax cut.  And, that WE part doesn’t actually include all that many people who file tax returns from Nevada.

Nevada by the Numbers:  2,940,058 Nevadans filed tax returns in 2015 (the last year for which statistics are available from the IRS.) 655,530 were individual tax returns and 440,130 were filed as joint returns.  There were 233,730 filed as Head of Household. 713,530 filers used paid preparers.  The number in that last category ranges from those who have extremely complicated filings to those of us who simply find it convenient to have someone else fill in the forms, or those who take advantage of tax prep companies who offer free filing services to those who don’t actually owe taxes or have small refunds due from the taxes they’ve already paid.

When we look at the adjusted gross incomes reported by Nevadans it may be useful to put the numbers in some context.  For example, the median income in Nevada is $51,847 and the per capita income is $26,541. The median value of a housing unit owned by the occupant is $173,700 and the median selected mortgage cost is $1,442 per month.  The median gross rent is reported as $973.00.  This gives us a preliminary picture of the 1,016,709 households in Nevada, and our population of 2,940,058.

1,350,730 Nevadans filed income tax returns in 2015.   27.21% of the Nevada filers reported adjusted gross income between $25,000 and $50,000.  13.5% of filers reported AGI between $50,000 and $75,000. 8.15% reported AGI between $75,000 and $100,000.  Another 10.22% reported an AGI between $100,000 and $200,000.  From this point on the percentage of filers by category drops, those reporting AGI between $200,000 and $500,000 were 2.48% of the filers; those reporting AGI between $500,000 and $1 million were 0.43%, and those reporting over $1 million AGI made up 0.26%.

The current (2017) tax brackets and explanations can be found compliments of the Tax Foundation in a convenient table form for single and joint filers. To make a long story a bit shorter, a person would have to have an AGI (adjusted gross income) of at least $191,650 if filing a single return to hit the 33% bracket, and $233,350 if filing a joint return.

The numbers indicate that 48.95% of those filing Federal income tax returns from Nevada are reporting below $100,000 in annual adjusted gross income.  Some of the 138,000 Nevada filings between $100,000 and $200,000 AGI may have been included in the bracket in which there is a $18,735.75 liability plus 28% of an excess over $91,900.  Fewer still would be in the 33% bracket with a liability of $46,643.75 plus 33% over $191,650.  Indeed, only 3.17% of Nevada returns reported AGI over $200,000 annually (35% and 39.6% brackets.)

Where’s the middle? Numbers are objective and instructive, but tax policy can get pretty emotional.   By the numbers a person earning about $52,000 per year in this state is in the “middle.”  Pew Research provides one of the more commonly accepted definitions of Middle Class, “2/3rds to 2 times the national median income for household size.”  In current parlance this would be in a range of $46,960 to $140,900.  If we compare this to the Nevadans filing tax returns in 2015 then 21.74% are in the $50,000 to $100,000 AGI range; some others will be in the $100,000 to $200,000 AGI range (10.22%.) Undifferentiated reporting with two sets of categorization make this a difficult call without being able to drill down into that latter classification of filers)  However, what these numbers do tell us is that to be considered a Middle Class Tax Cut the benefits should accrue to those earning between $46,960 (a little below the Nevada median earnings) and $140,900.

So, how does the current edition of the Republican tax plan fit into “the Middle.”

“Despite repeated promises from Republican lawmakers that the plan is designed to provide relief to the middle class, nearly 30 percent of taxpayers with incomes between $50,000 and $150,000 would see a tax increase, according to the study by the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. The majority of households that made between $150,000 and $300,000 would see a tax increase.” [WaPo]

The report from which the Washington Post article is derived is more specific.

“In 2018, the average tax bill for all income groups would decline. Taxpayers in the bottom 95 percent of the income distribution would see average after-tax incomes increase between 0.5 and 1.2 percent. Taxpayers in the top 1 percent (incomes above $730,000), would receive about 50 percent of the total tax benefit; their after-tax income would increase an average of 8.5 percent. Between 2018 and 2027, the average tax cut as a share of after-tax income would fall for all income groups other than the top 1 percent. In 2027, taxpayers between the 80th and 95th percentiles of income (between about $150,000 and $300,000) would experience a slight tax increase on average.”

There’s something about an analysis from the Tax Foundation reporting that 50% of the total tax benefit going to the top 1% that doesn’t sound precisely like a “middle class tax break.”  In short, the analysis makes it seem much more likely that the plan would be far more beneficial for the Nevada income earners who report AGIs over $500,000 per year, a total of 9,290 filers out of 1,350,730 who filed tax returns.  This really isn’t a “middle class tax cut.” At least not in terms of the real Nevadans, who report their real incomes.

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Senator Heller’s Second Shot at Slashing Medicare and Medicaid

“This morning, the Senate Budget Committee will consider a resolution that instructs lawmakers to find ways to reduce Medicaid spending by $1 trillion (and Medicare spending by $473 billion) over the next decade, according to supporting documentation that Democrats are publicizing.” [WaPo]

Here’s the strategy: “A fast-track “reconciliation” process that would allow for tax cuts costing $1.5 trillion over ten years that require only a simple majority to pass.  The $1.5 trillion cost would not have to be offset by closing tax loopholes or ending unproductive tax breaks, and thus would add to the nation’s deficits, which are already growing as the baby boomers retire.  In addition, the resolution would allow the Senate Finance Committee to cut critical programs under its jurisdiction, including Medicaid, Medicare, and basic assistance for poor seniors and people with disabilities, and then use those savings to make the tax cuts even larger (so that the net cost of the tax cuts and the budget cuts combined equaled $1.5 trillion).  The reconciliation process is the same process that Congress tried to use to repeal the ACA and requires only a simple majority to enact law.”  [CBPP] (emphasis added)

And, there we have it: (1) If it’s a Republican budget, then adding to the federal deficit doesn’t matter; (2) in order to provide for tax cuts to the top 1% of income earners in the United States, the Committee can slash funding for Medicaid, Medicare, basic assistance for senior citizens, and people with disabilities.

The trick is that the Senate Republicans have to pass a “budget” slashing spending for those aforementioned Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, elderly people in poverty, and disabled people, in order to create ‘space’ for the “reforms” in their tax legislation.  The buck slashing needs to stop here.

Please contact Senator Dean Heller, and let him know that these are not Nevada priorities.

202-224-6244

702-388-6605

775-686-5770

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Filed under Health Care, Heller, Medicaid, Medicare, Nevada politics, Politics