Tag Archives: ACA repeal

It’s Official: GOP Hates Women — Scamcare Edition

In case there’s anyone left who thinks the Republican Party is representing the needs of women in this country, the contradiction is right in front of us in the form of the Graham-Cassidy+Heller (tagging along) bill.

Amy Friedrich-Karnik, senior federal policy adviser at the Center for Reproductive Rights, pointed to a statistic from progressive think tank the Century Foundation that estimates 13 million women will lose access to maternity care services if the ACA is repealed. Friedrich-Karnik explained that the bill also blocks Medicaid patients from using Planned Parenthood, which bars access to essential preventative care like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment. “It also slashes Medicaid overall and into the future, and so really impacting particularly low-income women and women of color who rely on Medicaid broadly for their health care,” she said. According to the Kaiser Health Network, Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in America and covers family planning services for 13.5 million women. [Jez]

Not only is the bill a golf ball shot to the back of the head for Nevada women, it could cost the state some $250 million in funding:

Specifically, the proposal would eliminate the marketplace subsidies and federal dollars that states that chose to opt-in to Medicaid expansion under the ACA, like Nevada, currently receive, replacing them with block grants to be doled out to states, which would be left with the responsibility of deciding how to spend that money. It also converts almost the entire Medicaid program to a per capita cap, under which the federal government would set a limit on how much it reimburses states per enrollee, and allows states to waiver certain provisions from the ACA that require insurance companies to cover certain services and bars them from placing annual or lifetime caps on coverage. [NVInd]

Got that? Nevada gets a per capita cap, AND insurance corporations could refuse to cover pre-existing conditions, maternity care, family planning, women’s health care services, AND the corporations could revert to that wonderful old scam — the lifetime limit on coverage.  This isn’t as bad as the former “skinny” bill — it’s worse.

Senator Heller might have wanted to give this version some thought before he inked his name on the paperwork to co-sponsor the bill, but he didn’t.

It’s understandable that Nevadans are tiring of calling, writing, and sign making, but if Republicans are nothing else they are persistent.  They’re counting on public apathy, ignorance, and fatigue.  Not this time. Not on American health care. Not on our watch.

Senator Heller’s Washington DC office number is 202-224-6244.  Calls are tallied, and at some point the number of calls opposing this iteration of scam-care needs to impinge on the amount of money Republicans are counting on from the Koch Brothers and other right wing radicals.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Medicaid, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

What Nevada Loses under Trump-Doesn’t-Care

Here’s what Nevada loses under the egregious Trumpcare Bill:

(1)  138,100 citizens in Nevada will lose their health insurance coverage.

(2) 81,000 Nevadans will lose their Medicaid coverage.

(3) 439,000 Nevadans with pre-existing conditions will be put at risk.

(4) The bill cuts funding for care for 125,056 Nevadans with disabilities.

(5) It would raise the average health insurance premium for Nevadans by $677 in 2018.

(6) $288 million in new costs will be added to Nevadans in order to keep their Medicaid expansion.

Not a very good deal for the Silver State!

Call. Call. Call Senator Dean Heller.  702-388-6605    775-686-5770    202-224-6244

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Filed under health, health insurance, Heller, Medicaid, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

To Our GOP Friends Who Don’t Seem To Have A Clue How Insurance Works

We might go for the Ryan budget bill in regard health insurance directly, but others have already noted that either (a) he doesn’t have a clue how insurance works, or (b) he’s trying to pull a fast one on the American public.  At any  rate, the phase I of the ACA repeal is essentially a gigantic giveaway to health insurance and pharmaceutical corporations, a tax boon to those in the upper 0.1% income bracket, and a dismantling of the Medicaid program. The contents of Phase II have been tipped.  It’s on the Speaker’s website, but requires a bit of unpacking:

“Administration actions, notably by HHS Secretary Price, to stabilize the health insurance market, increase choices, and lower costs…”

Translation: The content of health insurance policies, currently listed as “essential provisions” for all policies, is under a head on assault.

If a corporation is going to offer a comprehensive health insurance policy for sale to customers, it must include “ambulatory care for patients in a hospital or not,” “emergency services,” “hospitalization,” “pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care,” “mental health and substance abuse treatment,” “prescription drugs,” “rehabilitation,” “laboratory services,” “preventive and wellness care,” “pediatric care including vision and oral care,” and “birth control and breastfeeding coverage.”

Now, just guess what parts of this coverage the GOP finds objectionable?  If you guessed anything having to do with WOMEN give yourself the prize of the day.

Why, the guys grouse, do I have to have a policy covering maternity and neo-natal care, birth control prescriptions, and pediatric care?  It’s because of how insurance works.

Aside from the obvious part wherein it requires both men and women to create a ‘maternity situation,’ the whole idea of insurance is encapsulated in the word POOL.

“When you buy insurance, you join many others who pay money to an insurance company.  The insurance company uses the money collected to pay claims that are submitted by those who have purchased insurance.  The money is “pooled” and losses and expenses are shared.  An important aspect is the members of a pool share similar risk characteristics.” [HIW]

In the case of health insurance, the “shared characteristic” of note is that everyone who buys a policy is a human being, who at some point will need health care.  The more people (policies) in the pool the wider the risk can be shared. And, that’s the point of insurance — spreading the risk among as many policy holders as possible.

Creating ‘cafeteria’ policies might be profitable for the insurance corporations, but it doesn’t make health care affordable for most people.  If we carve out special coverage for maternity care and remove this from the larger pool (which includes men) all this serves to do is to increase costs for those remaining in a smaller pool.  Similarly, if prostate cancer screening and treatment is carved out from comprehensive coverage, this serves to increase costs as the overall pool is diminished.

Got it? If not, think of your auto insurance.  10 people buy GenZ Insurance, 9 of them never file a claim, 1 does. The costs related to the one claim are shared among those who bought into the pool and paid premiums to maintain their insurance.  We require all automobile owners in this state to have at least minimal insurance. In Nevada, this means you have to have a policy covering $15,000 for bodily injury or death in an accident for one person, $30,000 for bodily injury or death of two persons in an accident, and $10,000 to cover property damage. Thus, all Nevada drivers must have at least minimal participation in the auto insurance pool. Again, the larger the pool the greater sharing of risk, the entire point of having insurance.

Back to health insurance, if we thought Phase I is a disaster, Phase II should be even worse. Phase III is the ‘portability canard.”  Has it occurred to anyone in the GOP hierarchy that nothing that really prevents insurance corporations from selling their policies across state lines — IF they agree to accept the standards set by state insurance commissions for the protection of their consumers.  More on this later — if necessary.

 

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Filed under Economy, Health Care, health insurance, Insurance, Politics