Tag Archives: Dean Heller

The Eternal Sunshine of a Perpetual Gadfly Candidate’s Mind: Tarkanian takes on Heller

The son of a former UNLV basketball coach, and leading candidate for the Sharron Angle Perpetual Campaigner award, Danny Tarkanian — Trump supporter and right winger has decided to give Senator Dean Heller a primary.  This may allow Senator Heller room to reprise his “I’m a moderate” role — well, yes, if one is compared to the Perpetual Candidate who says on his Facebook Page: (Let’s add some commentary– in red)

“Over the past several weeks, I have been inundated with text, emails, and phone calls from people of all walks of life across the state of Nevada who are upset with Dean Heller for campaigning one way in Nevada and voting the exact opposite in Washington DC. [This is interesting since Senator Heller has voted with Trump 89.6% of the time.]The refrain is the same: he turned his back on us.
Today, after much thought and discussion with my family and friends, I have decided to run for the United States Senate. [Here’s guessing he was waiting by the phone for the first call?] I am running for United States Senate because Nevada deserves a Senator who will keep his word and vote in Washington DC the same way he campaigns here in Nevada.  [Interesting since Heller tends to campaign as a moderate and vote as a conservative.]
I am a conservative Republican who supports the policies of President Trump to repeal Obamacare [And can we trust you have a PLAN to replace the ACA?] and end illegal immigration.  [Nothing like a flippant tip of the hat to gratuitous racism.] I will continue to support President Trump’s policies that have led to a 20% increase in the stock market in just six months. [continuing a market trend for the last umpteen quarters] I will join Senator Lee, Senator Cruz, and Senator Paul fighting for real reforms against the liberals in our party. [or, I intend to join the diehard purists in Congress who have contributed to gridlock; defining ‘liberal’ as anyone who isn’t carefully tucked into some corporate pocket…]
I look forward to campaigning across the state of Nevada [in perpetuity] and earning your support. It is time to take a stand. Together, we will make our state, and our country, proud.”

There’s more in the Nevada Independent.  <— well worth a click and read.

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Filed under Heller, Nevada, Nevada politics, Politics

The Moderate Heller Myth: Health Insurance Edition

Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) has cultivated his “moderate” image to the point that this adjective is attached to him with remarkable consistency — when if a person does even a perfunctory piece of research on his actual voting record what emerges is the model of a hard line conservative.  There is a pattern.  The Senator expresses “concerns” with a bill; then announces with ranging degrees of fanfare his opposition to a bill “in its current form,” then when the rubber grinds on the road surface the Senator votes along with the Republican leadership.

Why would anyone seriously believe he would support fixing the Affordable Care Act’s problems and not ultimately support what is now being called the “skinny repeal” version in the Senate based on the following voting record:

In 2007 then Representative Heller voted against the Medicare Prescription Drug Price Negotiation Act (HR 4).  Then on August 1, 2007 he voted against HR 3162, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program reauthorization.  The next day he voted against HR 734, the Prescription Drug Imports bill.  On March 5, 2008 he voted against HR 1424, the Mental Health Coverage bill.  Further into 2008 he voted “no” on HR 5501, the bill to fund programs fighting AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis, and “no” again on the concurrence version of the bill in July.   If he had a ‘flash’ of moderation during this period it happened in the summer of 2008 when he voted in favor of HR 5613 (Medicaid extensions and changes), HR 6631 (Medicare), the latter including a vote to override the President’s veto.  By November 2009 he was back in full Conservative mode.

He voted against HR 3962 (Health Care and Insurance Law amendments) on November 8, 2009, and HR 3961 (Revising Medicare Physician Fee Schedules and re-establishing PAYGO) on November 19, 2009.

In March 2010 Heller voted against HR 4872 (Health Care Reconciliation Act), and HR 3590 (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act).  He also voted against the concurrence bills.

January 19, 2011 he voted in favor of the Repealing the Health Care bill (HR 2).  He also signaled his stance on Planned Parenthood when he voted in favor of H.Amdt. 95 (Prohibiting the use of Federal funds for Planned Parenthood) on February 18, 2011.    He was in favor of repealing the individual mandate (HR 4), of repealing the Prevention and Public Health Fund (HR 1217).  May 4, 2011 he voted to repeal funding of the construction of school based health centers (HR 1214).

There was another “soft” period in some of his initial Senate votes in 2011, especially concerning the importation of medication from Canada (interesting since many prescription drugs are manufactured in other overseas sites).  See S. Amdt 769, S. Amdt 2111, and S. Amdt 2107 in May 2012.  On March 31, 2014 he voted in favor of HR 4302 (Protecting Access to Medicare).

He was back riding the Republican rails in September 2015, supporting an amendment to defund Planned Parenthood, (S. Amdt 2669) which failed a cloture vote.   Then on December 3, 2015 he voted in favor of another ACA repeal bill (HR 3762).    If we’re looking for patterns in this record they aren’t too difficult to discern. (1) Senator Heller can be relied upon to vote in favor of any legislation which deprives Planned Parenthood of funding for health care services, (2) Senator Heller can be relied upon to vote in favor of repealing the Affordable Care Act, and (3) Senator Heller’s voting record, if it illustrates any ‘moderation’ at all, comes in the form of dealing with prescription drug prices, but even that is a mixed bag of votes.

Thus, when he makes comments like the following:

“Obamacare isn’t the answer, but doing nothing to try to solve the problems it has created isn’t the answer either,” the statement read. “That is why I will vote to move forward and give us a chance to address the unworkable aspects of the law that have left many Nevadans — particularly those living in rural areas — with dwindling or no choices.

“Whether it’s my ideas to protect Nevadans who depend on Medicaid or the Graham-Cassidy proposal that empowers states and repeals the individual and employer mandates, there are commonsense solutions that could improve our health care system and today’s vote gives us the opportunity to fight for them. If the final product isn’t improved for the state of Nevada, then I will not vote for it; if it is improved, I will support it.”

We should examine them with some caution.   If he is referring to rural Nevada voters as ‘victims’ of the Affordable Care Act he might want to note that before the ACA there was one insurer in the northern Nevada rural market and if there is only one now that’s really not much of a change, much less a “nightmare.”  Nor is he mentioning that the proposed cuts to Medicaid will have a profoundly negative effect on rural Nevada hospitals. [DB previous]

That Graham-Cassidy proposal isn’t exactly a winner either:

“The new plan released Thursday morning and written by Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) would block grant about $500 billion of federal spending to the states over 10 years to either repeal, repair or keep their ObamaCare programs.”

We have no idea if the number is an accurate estimate of what would keep the health care systems of all 50 states afloat — no one seems to want to ‘score’ anything these days.  Additionally, Americans should be aware by now that when Republicans chant “Block Grant” they mean “dump it on the states, wash our hands, and walk away” while the states struggle to keep up with demands to meet needs and provide services, operating on budgets which cannot function on deficits.

Then, there’s that perfectly typical Hellerian comment: “If it is improved, I will support it,” leaving the issue entirely up to Senator Heller’s subjective assessment if “it” has improved his re-election chances enough to go along with it while not upsetting his very conservative base.  Meanwhile, the media persists in repeating the “Moderate Heller” mythology, and we haven’t even begun to speak of his actions to thwart and later repeal any common sense regulations on the financial sector.

 

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Filed under conservatism, Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Medicaid, Medicare, Nevada Test Site, Politics, public health, Republicans, Rural Nevada, SCHIP

Heller at the President’s Right: Lunch Time At The White House

Nothing like watching Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) sitting next to POTUS, smiling and applauding as the remarks from the President replicate every standard talking point made by every Republican since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.  Including such wonderful clichés as:

You’ll pay lower premiums (Oh, such lower premiums you won’t believe) — Any fool can sell low premium policies, the ones with high deductibles and co-pays, limited benefits, and caps.  Worse still, these junk policies will be sold across state lines so that consumer standards and protections of the worst level of protection will be the standard.

The states will have control over Medicaid (smaller units will be better for individual needs)  Nothing like blowing a big wide ‘beautiful’ hole in the Nevada budget!  Cutting $770B from Medicaid will have effects far beyond Nevada’s capacity to support its elderly, its children, its rural health care facilities, its support for low income working families.  That was the point of Medicaid — expenses far beyond the capacity of individual states could be shared nationwide, allowing medical care and services for the greatest good for the greatest number.

Some counties only have one insurance corporation offering policies in the individual market.  Did the president recall that before the ACA there were some counties that had no insurance corporations offering policies in the individual market.  There’s a solution to this problem — one the president didn’t mention — establish a public option.

Then there flowed the usual barrel of platitudes and campaign rhetoric, freedom and flexibility, low cost with high coverage,  everyone can get better insurance, reduce burdensome taxation, burdensome regulation….

And there was Senator Dean Heller, smiling as though siding with the president isn’t going to be a major political problem for him in the 2018 campaign season.  It makes a person wonder.

Senator Heller can be reached at 202-224-6244, 775-686-5770; 702-388-6605

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Politics

Embattled Bill Entangled Senator

While the Russians are in, or not in, meetings which are, or aren’t important, and which do or don’t offer trade-craft dangles — there’s a Senate version of the health insurance bill as egregious as its predecessors.  The hold music of the morning on Senator Dean Heller’s DC office phone is a static infused version of The Battle Hymn of the Republic while a person waits for an opportunity for leave a message for the Senator urging opposition to the health care insurance bill.

There’s a reason no one likes this bill — it puts insurance corporations back into the bifurcated market  with high premiums for those older and lower premiums (with higher co-payment and deductible out of pocket expenses) for younger, or less affluent, customers.  It puts state budgets at extreme risk. It slashes Medicaid funding (in conjunction with the proposed budget), thus placing services for children and the elderly in peril.

Senator Heller is described as being wedged into a hard place — between the desires of the hard right (and perhaps the bounteous coffers of Sheldon Adelson) and the hopes of his constituents and the Governor who want reasonable access to affordable health care insurance.

“Heller, in other words, has backed himself into a corner. Either he honors the concerns he raised just a few weeks ago, or reverses course and completes a very public betrayal – the year before his re-election campaign.” [NBC]

It’s time to offer Senator Heller a way out of this box — encouraging his continued opposition to the health insurance bill — call 202-224-6244; or 702-388-6605; or 775-686-5770.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Politics

Health, Wealth, and Senator Heller: Recommended Reading

Health care continues as a high priority item for Nevadans, and Greg Sargent’s article for the Washington Post points out how the “GOP Stunt Backfired…and why,” is highly recommended for pulling the tarpaulin off the GOP obfuscation concerning the Affordable Care Act.  The New York Times reports on the impact of the health insurance battle on other elements of the GOP agenda.  Ian Millhiser warns us that if we stop paying attention, the GOP wins.  Meanwhile,…

Senator Dean Heller continues to spout the party lines (the part under the tarp) while ostensibly opposing the repeal bill:

“Under the ACA, premiums have increased 7 times faster than wages, and federal regulations under the law’s employer mandate have cut workers’ hours, wages, or both.”

Nothing like tossing one’s apples and oranges together and expecting to get grape juice.  Some significant elements are missing from this pithy bit of prose.  First, premiums have increased, but not at an equal pace in all states. Secondly, the rate of premium increases have slowed during the implementation of the ACA.  Third, wages have been stagnant during the past decade, but that has little to do with the enactment of health care insurance reform — in fact, lower wage working Americans were included in the Medicaid expansion– the very program the GOP wants to slash in order to provide tax cuts to wealthy Americans.

Senator Heller believes that re-importation of prescription drugs and allowing insurance purchases across state lines are part of the solution.  Notice that he’s not in favor of so much competition as to allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices in the manner allowed to the Veterans Administration.  Also notice that he’s not mentioning that some states have rather more lax requirements for the sale of comprehensive health insurance than others.  The “across state lines,” or “portability argument” sounds good until we recall that states build in consumer protections into their regulatory frameworks.  If we could be guaranteed that portability would be a function of the most rigorous consumer protections there’s something to be discussed herein; if not, it’s simply a formula for a race to the bottom.

This is no time to remove our attention to the decimation of health insurance affordability —

Senator Heller can be reached in Las Vegas at 702-388-6605; Reno at 775-686-5770; and DC at 202-224-6244.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

It Ain’t Over Until The Fat Golfer Sings

Senator McConnell’s Secret Health Insurance Shop is still working, with the Lobbyists/Elves seeking a way to offer goodies acceptable to the wavering and the wanton.  Keep calling!  and if you’d like more information to substantiate your comments there are some excellent sources.

Kaiser Family Foundation:   Your one stop center for research and analysis on health insurance issues.  Definitely a “bookmark this” recommendation.  Today, KFF notes that before the implementation of the ACA individual insurance plans for health care did not cover delivery and maternity care  in 75% of the policies; 45% of the policies didn’t cover substance abuse treatment; and 38% failed to cover any mental health care services.

If terms like “risk adjustment,” “re-insurance,” and “risk corridors” seem like something written in Minoan Linear A, the KFF has an excellent summation of these technical terms in easily understood American English.

There are also some analytical pieces on the impact of Republican suggestions for health care insurance “reform” as they relate to rural health care in the following:

Human Rights Watch — Senate Health Care Bill A Swipe At Rural United States.

MSNBC/Scarborough – Rural Health Care Would Be Savaged By This Bill.

There’s a narrative going around that Democrats haven’t brought anything to the table, which depends on whether we’re taking the long or short term view.  In the short term this would be true — because the McConnell Secret Health Insurance Shop didn’t invite any Democratic participation,  for that matter there seems to have been some Republican Senators who were left in darkness.  The longer view would note some of the following:

Senator Franken’s “Rural Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 2016” (pdf) S. 3191 (114th Congress) was introduced in July 2016 and “died” in the Senate Finance Committee.  The bill would have amended two titles of the Social Security Act to improve health care in rural areas of the United States.

There is Representative Jan Shakowsky’s CHOICE Act, H.R. 635, which would establish a public option under the ACA.  See also S. 194, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse’s CHOICE Act.  There’s Rep. Gene Green’s HR 2628 to stabilize Medicaid and the Children’s Insurance program.  Rep. John Conyers introduced his form of “single payer” in his Medicare for All bill, HR 676.  On the topic of making pharmaceuticals more affordable:  Senator Sanders – Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act S. 469.  Senator Klobuchar has a bill “… to allow for expedited approval of generic prescription drugs and temporary importation of prescription drugs in the case of noncompetitive drug markets and drug shortages.” S. 183. Rep. Kurt Schrader introduced H.R. 749 to increase competition in the pharmaceutical industry.  Senator Ron Wyden introduced S. 1347, RxCap Act of 2017.

Senator Klobuchar has also introduce a bill supporting Alzheimer’s caregivers in S.311.  Rep. Derek Kilmer’s bill, H.R. 1253, seeks to improve access to treatment for mental health and substance abuse issues.   This is by NO means an exhaustive list of what can be gleaned from Gov.Track, but it does illustrate that the Democrats are not without suggestions — negotiating drug prices for Medicare, stabilizing the current system, public options, single payer — it’s just that these bills won’t get out of Republican controlled committees and they didn’t make it into Senator McConnell’s Secret Shop.

Indulge in no victory dance, we’ve seen this movie before … don’t believe that some minor blandishment won’t be enough to lure Senator Heller from his current position …don’t think that the products of McConnell’s Secret Shop have stopped coming off their assembly line.

Senator Heller can be reached at 202-224-6224;  702-388-6605;  775-686-5770

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, nevada health, Pharmaceuticals, Politics, public health

Here’s What Senator Heller Is About To Support

The GOP controlled Senate is trying to fast-track a backroom health insurance bill which contains some exceedingly unpopular provisions, including the following:

Age Tax:  A provision gives insurance corporations the power to charge up to 5 times more for people aged 50 to 65.  It is estimated that premiums could rise as much as $8400 for a person 64 years old.

Ending ACA Protections:  The bill ends ACA protections, and allows insurance corporations to sell policies with lifetime and annual limits, policies Consumer Reports and other consumer protection organizations have categorized as Junk Insurance.

Cuts critical coverage: The bill in its current form allows insurance corporations to refuse to cover maternity care, substance abuse, and opioid addiction treatment. If a person has a pre-existing condition the insurance corporation could refuse to provide coverage for the prescription medication or services needed.

Benefits insurance corporations at the expense of the policy holders.  Insurers could use more of a person’s premium payments for profits if the states opt out of the medical loss ratio rules; current rules have reduced costs and recovered nearly $3 billion for millions of families.

Ends Medicaid Expansion: Ends Medicaid expansion and guts Medicaid help for senior citizens, children, and people with disabilities.

Caps Medicaid: Places caps on Medicaid which endangers 1 out of every 5 Americans.

Cuts care:  The bill in its current form cuts care for nursing home patients, Veterans’ care, care for people with disabilities, and care for those with opioid addiction.

Tax Cuts for the Wealthy: The bill in its current form provides large tax cuts for wealthy Americans and for corporations.

 “A study by the Tax Policy Center, a nonpartisan research group, found that when the bill would take full effect in 2022, 40 percent of the benefits from the tax cuts would go to the richest one percent of the country. Those households would receive an average tax cut of $37,000, or 2.1 percent of their incomes. People in the lowest income bracket would get an average tax cut of $150, an amount that is just 0.9 percent of their earnings.” [NYT March 15, 2017]

It’s hard to imagine a collection of provisions such as this could even be remotely classified as “moderate.” It’s simply window dressing on the egregious House version of the bill.  Expect some tip of the hat to “protecting those with pre-existing conditions,” with a major loophole to allow the insurance corporations to charge higher premiums for those who have pre-existing conditions.  Also in the window dressing category — we’re going to cut Medicaid assistance to the states, but we’re not going to do it for X number of years (the current X = 7).  A cut is a cut no matter when it happens.

Let Senator Dean Heller know how you feel about his support for this bill. Soon, before the Senate has the chance to ram this through without public hearings, and with a limited amount of time for representatives and citizens to review the provisions.

H/T to Andy Slavit for his succinct summation of the bill, from which this post is taken.  Follow him on Twitter for more information!

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Politics