Tag Archives: Rosen

Fire hosed, Gas lit, and Overlooked

Sometimes there’s more to be observed than will fit in a short Tweet.  For example, there’s Senator Dean Heller’s ad on my TV machine telling me that his opponent, Rep. Jacky Rosen, is “soft on MS 13.”  It might be said the ad says more about Senator Dean Heller than it does about his opponent.  Right off the bat there’s that conflation between immigrants and gang members.  “Mexicans are rapists, drug dealers, and some, I suppose are nice people.”  Exactly why Senator Heller thinks running ads with negative inferences concerning Hispanic individuals will play well in a state wherein 27.3% of the population is of Hispanic or Latino heritage remains a mystery.  Secondly,  it’s also confounding why Senator Heller’s campaign is replicating Trump’s ’16 talking points as if repetition is the sincerest way to victory.  Trump did not carry Nevada.  If the talking points didn’t work then, why are they supposed to work now? And this with Trump’s August approval rating in Nevada dropping by 4 points, and a disapproval rating of 50%.  Finally, about 75% of the state’s population lives in Clark County (Las Vegas metro area).  If the rules of arithmetic still hold that means the rest of Nevada’s miles and miles and miles of miles and miles and miles account for only 25% of the population — and the votes.  Or, some 460,587 people live in Washoe County, and then it’s mostly wide open spaces. Acreage doesn’t vote.  The Inyo National Forest area of Esmeralda County is beautiful, but if a candidate for statewide office spends more than eight minutes there going after the support of all 850 residents, he or she is quite likely to lose a statewide election.  Likewise, if candidate A is talking about immigration and B is talking about health care; and the voters care more about health care… the results are obvious.

Frankly speaking the Senate race in Nevada is closer than it should be.  Heller is an incumbent, well financed, and reasonably well organized.  His opponent is a relative new face, a newly minted Congressional Representative, but also well financed and reasonably well organized.  The incumbency factor should be well in Heller’s favor.  However, the more he adheres to the Trumpian base with its attendant racism, anti-immigration policies, and pie in the sky economics of deregulation, the less he connects with Nevada voters.  He’ll be very popular in White Pine County (9,811 population) but risks it all in Clark County (2.115 million population.)

While most eyes are watching the Kavanaugh debacle unfold on cable news and on Saturday Night Live, there’s that immigration policy story from the White House that just won’t go away.  A federal district judge in California might be poised to do for the protected status changes the Trump Administration wants what a previous judge did for Muslim bans numbers one and two.   There’s also the “public charge” rule change the administration wants that is set to make major steps in the Make America White Again policy, and these proposals merit more attention.  [See more on this topic here.]  Administration policies have also been especially harsh on women — why are we not surprised?  At least one commentator has noticed Trumpian rhetoric sounds similar to KKK hypernationalism of the 1920s.   White House advisers seem to come and go with revolving door regularity — but Stephen Miller remains forever.  Wonder why that is?

Are we looking at the wrong analogy?  Yes, Thomas Jefferson did his very best to be rid of Samuel Chase on the US Supreme Court.  Chase remained on the Court, Jefferson remained annoyed.  However, in modern terms should we be looking more carefully at the example of Abe Fortas, Johnson ally and a man who lasted on the Supreme Court from 1965 to 1969?   Remember, there are some serious questions about Kavanaugh’s finances which, to date, have not been thoroughly answered.  Someone is going to do a bit of investigative research and publish more information.  The “bombshell” may be the charges of sexual misconduct leveled by women against Judge Kavanaugh; the larger delayed-action bomb (think of the aerial bombs dropped by British, American, and German bombers during World War II) may well lie in the more quotidian category of Kavanaugh’s personal debts and finances?  Stay tuned.

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Heller’s Negation

Dean Heller’s latest launch on my TV machine is a negative commercial about Rep. Jacky Rosen’s lack of a legislative record.  “Zero” is an attempt to demonstrate Heller’s acumen and influence on Capitol Hill?  Whoa Nelly.  His 2017 “Report Card” is in and I’m not all that impressed with what he has done.  Let’s dive a bit deeper.

Heller wrote S. 42, which passed as H.R. 321, which required NASA to develop a plan for retired NASA personnel to engage with girls in STEM subjects.  Nice.  Notice the “develop a plan” portion.  If you like cotton candy at the carnival, then you’d probably like the Congressional version of this floss — legislation calling for Plans to do good stuff.  Not that there’s funding to do the good stuff, or that there’s a deadline for doing the good stuff except to call for a report to a congressional committee within 90 days of enactment.  It’s better than Zero, but not by much.

Heller seems especially fond of citing S. 114, a VA Choice Act allowing veterans to seek medical treatment at private facilities if the treatment wasn’t available at a VA center. Again, nice, but this idea isn’t original with Senator Heller.  The program was in existence BEFORE Senator Heller wrote the extension bill.  There’s another little problem with this bill — the funding.  Objections to this bill were raised at the time, from both sides of the aisle because the funding for the program extension came by moving money from other current VA programs.  Rob Peter to pay Paul much?

I’d recommend readers take a hard look at S. 327, an esoteric bill about ETF reports, authored by Senator Heller.  Americans for Financial Reform opposed this bill, in part because:

AFR opposes S. 327, “The Fair Access to Investment Research Act”, and we urge a vote against this bill. S. 327 would create major new exemptions to rules governing broker-dealer research reports on exchange traded funds (ETFs). These exemptions would permit ETF sponsors to release research designed to promote their funds, without being covered by legal liability for false or misleading content or other standards designed to ensure accurate information for investors.

I’d highly recommend downloading and reading the pdf version of the AFR testimony on S. 327, in that it is one more shining example of Senator Heller’s proclivity for talking a good game about being opposed to bank bailouts, while doing everything in his power to facilitate ample rewards for financiers.   In other words, what Senator Heller’s bill actually does is allow ETF sponsors to release reports which may not be accurate and which may primarily serve to manipulate the markets.   Less than Zero would have been a good score on this one.

If this is an example of what Senator Heller’s doing to get Something Done, then I’d have been just as happy for him to have been a nice comfortable zero, since watering down Sarbanes-Oxley, dismantling Dodd Frank, and getting past the Volcker Rule seem to be Senator Heller’s priorities.   I’ve not been calling him the “Banker’s Boy” for nothing.

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Heller on the Slipface?

angle of reposeLet’s assume for the moment that much of the goings-on at the Residence on Pennsylvania Avenue have less to do with governance, and ever so much more to do with a tender ego, thin skin, and a perfectly illogical, nay irrational, sense of reality.  Further, we might also assume that Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) has calculated a return to his seat in the US Senate predicated on keeping the Trumpian Base happy.  After all, Heller was pleased to support Orange Blossom’s Muslim Ban [RGJ] after expressing some initial “concerns.”  The senior Senator is good at this, i.e. expressing initial concerns prior to caving in faster that a pile of  dry sand with a 35° angle of repose.   So, we shouldn’t be surprised to find he’s caved again.

Thus much for all that opposition to turning Nevada into the nation’s nuclear waste basket (Yucca Mountain), Senator Heller is willing to forgive and forget all that to tell us he has NO reservations about supporting the nomination of Mr. Kavanaugh to the US Supreme Court. [RGJ]  How convenient for the Orange Occupant of the Oval Office?  To have a Senator support the candidate most likely to declare the decision in US vs. Nixon a mistake. [WaPo]  Indeed, how very helpful!

Once having aligned himself with the Orange Occupant’s selection, Senator Heller may have to explain to his audiences (should he decide to have any with living people in them) how he is serving ALL the good people in the Silver State.

People who don’t necessarily believe the decision in Roe v. Wade should be overturned?  People who don’t necessarily believe that gun dealers have more rights than gun violence victims?  People who don’t necessarily believe that people with pre-existing medical conditions should be priced out of the health insurance markets?  People who don’t believe that ICE agents should be arresting and detaining victims of domestic abuse? People who don’t necessarily believe that the function of immigration enforcement agencies is to rip young children away from their parents, and then to be so incapable or incompetent as to make reuniting them nearly impossible — subsequently resorting to the ruse of declaring the un-reunited children as “ineligible” for a return to their parents.  What a cold and miserable calculation that categorization must be?

But, please, Senator Heller, do run as if this were still primary season.  Do cling to the increasingly disjointed, illogical, and downright cruel rantings of the Oval Office Occupant.  Do revert to the wedge issues of the 1980s and 1990s.  I’m sure your opponent, Rep. Jacky Rosen will be pleased to talk about —  offering affordable health care for all Nevadans, promoting women’s health and family well-being, advocating for employment opportunities and equal pay for all Nevada families.

“President Trump is trying to pull up the ladder behind him, leaving the middle class stranded while his super-wealthy buddies turn the federal government into a source of enrichment for themselves. Trump ridicules women, people of color, the LGBTQ community, immigrant families, and anyone who challenges him.” [Rosen]

So, while Senator Heller is clutching the banners on Trump’s bandwagon, Rosen would rather we take our own ride.  We can’t guarantee that the media will do much more than it did in 2016 — spend more time interviewing Trump and the Trumpians than discussing issues raised by Democratic candidates. Therefore, it will be up to Democrats to tell friends and neighbors about Rosen’s (and other Democratic candidates’) position on issues.  Rosen’s are here.

We know we’re about Health Care, Government Reform,  a Clean and Safe Environment, Education, a sane and humane Immigration Policy,  advancing the interests of Senior Citizens, attending to the Security of our Nation.   However, we can’t count on much help from a mass media which treats Republican candidates and their voters like the audience for Duck Dynasty — interesting, intriguing, anomalies who attract their attention.   If Democrats can’t be shiny objects for press and punditry, perhaps we can be loud and proud.

We don’t disparage the different and the disabled. We don’t find it necessary to call the cops on kids selling lemonade, hot dogs, and candy.  We don’t find it uncomfortable if someone who has a “natural tan” is in the swimming pool, or lives next door.  We The People buy up the candy the young lad was selling when the broad beamed bigot decided to launch her verbal assault.  We The People know how to make life a misery for the intolerant who call the cops to barbecues and college common rooms.  We The People know how to identify and shame the shameless. And, if some members of Congress don’t share our values of common decency, concern for the well being of others, or improving the lives of as many of our fellow citizens as possible, then We The People can always change the members of Congress.

The Trumpians, for all we care, can slide down the slipface of history.

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Waffles Heller, Heller Waffles

Heller spine poster.jpgThere are non-apology apologies (see Orange Blossom’s clumsy Hostage Video) and then there are non-disavowal disavowals (see Senator Dean ‘Clutching Papa’s Pants Leg’ Heller).

“Heller has been slow to criticize Trump as he looks to defend one of the most coveted GOP Senate seats in the country, and stopped well short of criticizing the president in a statementreleased late Monday afternoon.

“While I am not opposed to a dialogue between the two leaders, I trust our intelligence community’s assessment on Russian interference, not Vladimir Putin’s,” Heller said throu spokeswoman. “He is no friend of the United States and I don’t trust him.”  [RGJ]

Oh please!  I’ve tried to stretch the effect of a limited number of tea bags in a jar of sun tea and come out with less tepid ,,results.  Perhaps if the last line had directly pertained to the Orange Blossom, “He is no friend of the United States, and I don’t trust him,”  I’d have accepted this statement with more enthusiasm?

In the wake of the Charlottesville debacle there was a photo floating about of Senator Dean Heller and Peter Cvjetanovic, one of the Tiki Torch Nazis and a UNR student.  Heller responded in Trumpian fashion on Twitter: “I don’t know this person & condemn the outrageous racism, hatred and violence. It’s unacceptable & shameful. No room for it in this country.” [SacBee]  And Senator Heller said of the Orange Blossom?  Orange Blossom read one of his specially prepared on-paper ‘clarifications’ and promptly went right back off the rails with his Very Fine People.

Senator Heller’s spine made a brief reappearance in mid-June during the height of the Trump manufactured immigrant family crisis.  Thirteen Senators, among them Senator Dean Heller, wrote to the Mis-administration saying, in part:

“We support the administration’s efforts to enforce our immigration laws, but we cannot support implementation of a policy that results in the categorical forced separation of minor children from their parents,” the Republican senators wrote.

“We therefore ask you to halt implementation of the Department’s zero tolerance policy while Congress works out a solution that enables faster processing of individuals who enter our country illegally without requiring the forced, inhumane separation of children from their parents,” the senators continued. [TheHill]

Good. Now insert the following search terms into Google: “Nevada Senator Visits Border.” Who shows up in the search results?  Senator Catherine Cortez-Masto (D-NV).  During a June fundraiser with the *president, who got the crowd to chant “Build The Wall,” Senator Heller, “by contrast, spoke for under three minutes and didn’t mention immigration or the separation of children from parents at the border.” [LATimes]  Senator Cortez-Masto and Representative Jacky Rosen visited the border, Senator Heller’s spine went missing yet again.

This is the third instance, in a third major issue, in which Senator Heller has demonstrated his reluctance to take a firm stand — and we might note there’s a tendency on his part to take flexible positions on many other issues —  and to stick to it, even when there is an obvious and palpable reason to STAND for a crucial American attribute.  Charlottesville, Immigration, and now the Helsinki Debacle…strike one, strike two, strike three.

This might explain the following tidbit from the RJ? “Since announcing her candidacy in July 2017, Rosen has outraised Heller $8.3 million to $5.3 million.”  Granted Heller has a cash-on-hand advantage, but fundraising is often a measure of enthusiasm, and it’s hard to get enthusiastic about waffles. They are nice, you can serve them for breakfast, brunch, or lunch, put just about anything on them and they’ll soak it up; it’s just hard to get all that thrilled about them.

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It’s Official: No More Phony Memo Here

The cable news obsession with the highly questionable (I’m trying to be polite) memo from Devin Nunes’ staffers is sucking up the oxygen, and nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor from the air…or at least from the airwaves. So, how about some news that isn’t Dumb Memo related?

As if one weren’t too many, there’s a fellow being styled as the “next David Duke.”  The Huffington Post has an interesting article about this bit of algae mass in stagnant water.  It seems the “White Ethno-State” is as phony as the leader.   In a related publication the New York Daily News offers a good piece on the NFL and the players’ protests, speaking of the origins of the flag ceremonies:

However, that’s not the case anymore. In 2015, two senators released a report that found that the Department of Defense spent $6.8 million on “paid patriotism” between 2012 and 2015. The money, which was spread out amongst 50 pro teams from the NFL, NBA, MLB, and others, was for teams to do flag presentations, honor military members and reenlistment ceremonies.

Which begs the question: How can black players who protested the flag be unpatriotic if the faux patriotism that we see before every NFL game had a price tag?

Good question.

Be careful of slipping on ICEPBS reports: “Federal immigration authorities formalized a policy Wednesday to send deportation agents to federal, state and local courthouses to make arrests, dismissing complaints from judges and advocacy groups that it instills fear among crime victims, witnesses and family members.”   The official guidelines are here (pdf).   Gee, what could possibly go wrong?  Oh, how about a person showing up at a traffic court?  The man’s crime, in case anyone’s interested, is that his DACA status expired although he is still eligible for an extension.  He has no other criminal record. Or how about detaining an immigrant (with green card) while he and his wife were in court as part of an interview to establish their official status as a married couple.  Or, the Polish immigrant doctor arrested on January 16, 2018 by ICE for having two misdemeanor offenses on his record as a teen; he was released on bond  yesterday.  Then there are the two detainees in Florida who have died in custody.    At least there’s one federal judge who isn’t amused.

America alone means China First:  at least in terms of amassing trade deals, “From deals with blocs including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations to bilaterals with tiny countries like Maldives, China’s FTAs already cover 21 countries. That compares with the 20 countries covered by U.S. agreements. More than a dozen additional pacts are being negotiated or studied, according to the Ministry of Commerce. ” (FTA = Free Trade Agreement)

Renegotiate a better NAFTA?  Maybe not, the administration’s trade rep is clashing with the neighbors.   Secretary of State Rex Tillerson appears to be trying to help clean up the mess.

Jobs Jobs Jobs: Harley Davidson is cutting production (read: layoffs) as a result of declining sales.  Wal-Mart is planning on store closures and other layoffs, “in the thousands.”  Sears is laying off 220 from its corporate offices. Whirlpool confirms it is planning layoffs.  Pandora is laying off 5% of its workforce.  Kimberly Clark is paying for its layoffs with its shiny new tax cuts.

Closer to home: The Nevada Independent reviews some important state races. (Highly recommended reading)  Reno city officials are having a tough time explaining how they handled an ex-employee’s sexual assault complaint.  Rep. Jacky Rosen announces her introduction of a bill to assist homeless veterans.

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The Happy Hackers Act HR 634: A Second Look

Let’s return for a moment to HR 634, otherwise known in this space as the “Happy Hackers Act of 2017.”

The link above should take you to the text of the bill as introduced by Rep. Gregg Harper (R-MS).  In one page the bill terminates the Election Assistance Commission, puts the OMB in charge of “transition,” fobs the duties off on the dysfunctional FEC, and off we go into the wild west of happy hackers.

The bill was introduced on January 24, 2017 and was reported out on a 6-3 party line vote in the House Committee on Administration on February 7th, the same day Democrats filed objections  (pdf) to the measure with the House Committee on Administration.  Democrats noted that the EAC plays a “critical role in holding voting machine vendors accountable and ensuring certification standards remain high.”

Placing jurisdiction over federal election system regulation in the hands of the FEC is cynical at best and destructive at worst.  Atlantic magazine reported in December 2013 that the FEC was “broken” amid a flood of cases of questionable money flowing into campaigns, with feuds boiling between commissioners, and a hack attack attributed to agents of the Chinese government. Two years later the New York Times reported the FEC was incapable of curbing election abuses in the upcoming 2016 elections.   On February 20, 2017 the Chairwoman of the FEC resigned.   It is into the hands of this commission, now with one independent,  three Republicans, one Democrat, and one vacant seat, that the House Administration Committee wants to place the future of voting machines and certification standards.   The ill-advised HR 634 would place certification standards in the hands of an underfunded, understaffed (300 employees to cover 8,000 election jurisdictions in 50 states plus the District of Columbia) agency.  This is conducive to yet another layer of backlogs as questions raised about voting machine security and certification standards would be added to an already debilitated commission. If the intention is to slash oversight on voting machine/system security HR 634 would certainly accomplish that goal.

We’ve been the unfortunate recipient of hacking into our elections at the hands of the Russian government (2016) a conclusion reached by 16 intelligence agencies and the intelligence community leadership, despite the President’s feckless commentary on the subject; and if security standards are unenforced then we’re at even greater risk of intrusion into what has heretofore been unavailable to Russian hackers — the actual vote tally itself.

It’s unfortunate the bill was reported out of committee last February, it would be even more lamentable if the bill were to make it to the floor for a vote; and yet

more calamitous should the bill pass the House of Representatives.


Representative Mark Amodei (R-NV2) can be reached at 5310 Kietzke Lane #103, Reno, Nevada 89511; 905 Railroad Street #104D, Elko, NV 89801; or 332 Cannon Building, Washington, DC 20515.

Representative Ruben Kihuen (D-NV4): 313 Cannon Building, Washington, DC 20515; 2250 North Las Vegas Blvd #500, North Las Vegas, NV 89030

Representative Jacky Rosen (D-NV3): 8872 S. Eastern Avenue #220, Las Vegas, NV 89123; 413 Cannon Office Building, Washington, DC 20515.

Representative Dina Titus (D-NV1): 2464 Rayburn Office Building, Washington, DC 20515; 495 S. Main St. 3rd floor, Las Vegas, NV 89101.

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SJR 34 and Your Internet Privacy

The purpose of SJR 34 (and HJR 86) was simple: To allow Internet Service Providers to collect and sell your Internet browsing history.  Not only did Senator Dean Heller support this, he signed on as a co-sponsor of the bill on March 7, 2017, one of 23 sponsors to do so.  Who’s impacted by this? Anyone who links through Comcast (17 million customers), AT&T (another 17 million customers), Time Warner Cable (add another 14 million customers), Century Link (additional 6.4 million customers), Charter (another 5 million customers), and a host of smaller providers. [Ecom] (See also PEcom)

Nevada customers of AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner, Charter, Cox and others, are also among those whose private browsing history can be tracked, collected, and sold off. [into link]

It seems bad enough to have the ISPs sell off information about browsing history to advertisers, who after browsing one day for sneakers, would want to be bombarded by advertising for the next year with sneaker ads?  Browsed for ‘best garden supplies?’ Expect ads for plant food, fertilizers, spades, and wheelbarrows for eternity? Then the scenarios become more pernicious.

Browse for information on asthma? Not only is the human browser now in line for a multitude of ads for medications, but there’s a hint here that some personal medical history may have been collected and sold.  The same issue might be raised about those looking up symptoms and treatments for everything from pediatric illnesses to Alzheimer’s Disease.  Thus far we’re only talking about the initial sales, and the use of the collections by commercial advertisers. However, there’s a question about what constitutes a buyer for the information?

The buyer might not have to be, for example, the Interpublic Group of New York City, one of the nation’s largest advertising firms. Could the buyer be the WPP Group of London, UK? Or, the Dentsu Group, of Tokyo. Could the buyer be RMAA, the largest advertising firm in Russia? Is there any protection in the bill to prevent the secondary sale of browser histories from an advertising agency to a data management and analysis company? What we have herein is a bill to allow the transfer of massive amounts of valuable data collected from individuals in the United States to the highest bidder, with little or no consideration of the after effects.

Gee, let’s hypothesize that I’m a foreign power with some experience dabbling in US state and national elections.  Let’s also assume that the foreign power is familiar with inserting ‘bots’ to drive traffic to particular websites, or insert fake news, confirmation bias ‘news,’ and other practices into the research patterns of American Internet users. What do I want? I want data on where those people ‘go’ on the Internet; the better I know my ‘target’ the better I can hone my message. Do those who go to Senator Bilgewater’s site also tend to go to sites concerning wildlife preservation?  If I can put these two bits of information together I can more effectively insert advertising either for or against the Senator. I can more effectively insert phony information into my messaging for the supporters or opponents of Bilgewater.  In short, I can ‘dabble’ more efficiently. Even more bluntly, have we handed our adversaries more ammunition for their advertising and propaganda guns?

The Senate twin in the House (HJR 86)/SJR 34 passed on March 28, 2017, only Representative Mark Amodei (R-NV2) voted in favor of the bill; Representatives Kihuen, Titus, and Rosen voted against it. [RC 202]

At the risk of facetiousness  on a serious topic, when Jill, of downtown East Antelope Ear, NV, goes online to search for a bargain on bed sheets, does she find herself viewing a plethora of ads for sex toys, a result of Jack’s periodic perusal of pornography sites? Would a simple search for high thread count sheets yield the splitting of those sheets in the Jack and Jill household? At least Jack and Jill will know whom to call about the issue — Senator Dean Heller and Representative Mark Amodei, who thought selling browser histories to be a grand idea at the time.

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