Tag Archives: student loan debt

Nevada and the Tax Scam: Debts Debts and More Debts

The Bureau of Economic Analysis has some important numbers for the state of Nevada.  As of September 26, 2017 the agency reports Nevada’s per capita personal income was $43,567 ranking 32nd in the US and 88% of the national average.  However, the numbers don’t signify as much as they could without looking at the trends in which they occur.

“The 2016 PCPI reflected an increase of 1.0 percent from 2015. The 2015-2016 national change was 1.6 percent. In 2006, the PCPI of Nevada was $39,930 and ranked 15th in the United States. The 2006-2016 compound annual growth rate of PCPI was 0.9 percent. The compound annual growth rate for the nation was 2.6 percent.”

There are at least two things to unpack from this. First, it’s evident Nevada took a wallop from the Great Recession in the wake of the Housing Bubble and Wall Street Casino collapse. Secondly, Nevada’s per capita personal income isn’t growing at a pace which would make anyone too confident of increased disposable income for Nevada consumers.   In fact, it makes one think we’re going to be looking at increased levels of household indebtedness — again.

Another number to toss into this mix is the inflation rate, ranging in 2017 from about 1.6% to 2.7%.  And now we come to the inflated promises of the President* and the members of the 115th Congress who claim that their tax plan will “put more money into consumers’ pockets.”  Not. So. Fast.

It’s no secret the Tax Bill benefits those in the upper income brackets far more than it does those in the lower quintiles of the tax brackets.  Nor is it any surprise that the pass through benefits inserted into the bill are a windfall for a select group of businesses which in most circumstances don’t really qualify for the brand “small business.”  Therefore, it’s hard to visualize how this plan truly benefits the “average” Nevada taxpayer.

It’s even harder to see how the bill would create the kind of growth necessary for the bill to “pay for itself.”  The conclusion of the Tax Policy Center isn’t exactly comforting:

TPC has also released an analysis of the macroeconomic effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act as passed by the Senate on December 2, 2017. We find the legislation would boost US gross domestic product (GDP) 0.7 percent in 2018, have little effect on GDP in 2027, and boost GDP 0.1 percent in 2037.

If you’re thinking this isn’t enough to boost the per capita personal income level in Nevada, except for a chosen few, you’re probably right on target. Nor is there much reason to believe the Growth Fairy will wave her wand more strenuously anywhere else in the country.  What do people do when wages and salaries don’t increase by all that much, inflation creeps up, and those people want to maintain their standards of living? The borrow.  And this is where DB starts jumping up and down again sounding alarms.

Look, for example, at the NY Fed Report from February 2017: (pdf)

Aggregate household debt balances increased substantially in the fourth quarter of 2016. As of December 31, 2016, total household indebtedness was $12.58 trillion, a $226 billion (1.8%) increase from the third quarter of 2016. Overall household debt remains just 0.8% below its 2008Q3 peak of $12.68 trillion, but is now 12.8% above the 2013Q2 trough.

Yes, this dry as dust account is saying that levels of household debt are perilously close to what they were just before the Bubble splattered all over our economy in 2008.  There are a couple of reasons not to panic — quite yet.  The level of debt delinquencies hasn’t approached the 2008 level, and we’re seeing fewer bankruptcy filings.  [CNN Money]  There are a few more dessicated sentences from the Fed of note:

“…while comparable in nominal aggregate size, the composition of current household debt is very different from that in 2008. We pointed out in a recent press briefing that debt balances are evolving; mortgages now have a much smaller share than in 2008, auto and student loans have increased in their share, and balances are increasingly shifting towards more creditworthy and older borrowers.”

Read: Mortgage debt is down, student and automobile debt is up. Banks are lending to older borrowers with better credit.  This situation is fine for the banks and those who invest in them, it isn’t exactly cause for young people to rejoice.

At the risk of sounding alarmist — we do need to watch the effects of those automobile loans on the financial sector because those loans (like the mortgages before them) are sold into secondary markets (securitized) and there are some initial warning signs.

One industry analysis doesn’t provide all the comfort I’d care to feel at the moment:

In fact, S&P Global Ratings has issued 881 upgrades and no defaults or downgrades on the subprime auto ABS deals it’s rated from 2004 to present. However, the company ran a stress test simulating what another financial crisis-like event would look like today and found that subprime losses would rise 1.67 times higher than S&P’s baseline expectations for the economy. So while the markets are stable, there are certainly economic factors to watch for.  “Yes, losses are going up from 2015 and 2016, and are even approaching recessionary levels,” Amy Martin, S&P’s senior director, told Auto Finance News. “But you have to look at it relative to what’s happening with the ratings, and the ratings are very stable.”

Yes, auto loans are up, increasing the transactions in the secondary market, but we should all relax because the ratings are stable? The last time we put our faith in the ratings agencies every investment bank on Wall Street fell into its own sink hole.

If I’m a little shaky on the subject of auto loans and their securitization, I’m even less enthusiastic about what’s been happening on the student loan front.  Again, from the NY Fed which as a good track record for keeping tabs on the student loan situation:

Interestingly, though the difference in default rates between two- and four-year private college students is not large (less than 5 percentage points at age thirty-three), this is not the case for public college students. Default rates for community college (two-year public college) students are nearly 25 percentage points higher than those for their counterparts in four-year public colleges. The chart below also shows that while for-profit students have the highest default rates, the default rates of community college students are not too different from those of for-profit students (36 percent versus 42 percent for two-year and 39 percent for four-year for-profit students, respectively, at age thirty‑three).

And now comes the trap: While the administration and GOP controlled Congress make it harder for students to escape the clutches of student loan purveyors, the default rates are ominous.  Further, once in the student loan trap it becomes harder for younger people to become those “older creditworthy” souls to whom banks want to offer mortgages. The following assessment isn’t all that encouraging for the housing market:

“At any given age, holding debt is associated with a lower rate of homeownership, irrespective of degree type. While the homeownership gap between debt-holding and non-debt-holding bachelor’s-plus students remains relatively constant, that for associate degree students expands with age. Associate degree students who take on debt buy homes at almost the same rate as those who never went to college until they reach age twenty-five, when their homeownership rate rises above that of those who never went to college. At age thirty-three, the non-college-goers are almost 4 percentage points behind their peers who enrolled in associate degree programs and took on student debt, while lagging behind debt-free bachelor’s-plus students by 25 percentage points.”

The situation isn’t immediately indicative of economic peril BUT there are some points to remember.  While home-ownership is down (banks are looking for older more creditworthy borrowers) auto loans and student debt are up, and student indebtedness is linked to a reduction in home-ownership.  Meanwhile, the per capital personal income keeps slogging upward at a pace making garden snails look swift.   If you are wondering  from whence comes the fuel for the Growth Fairy — so am I.

Thus far the only elements I see emanating from this GOP controlled Congress are an untoward enthusiasm for giving tax breaks to those who need them the least, an equally unpropitious capacity to ignore trends in household indebtedness, coupled with an almost vexatious tendency to put the burdens on younger generations of Americans for whom education is increasingly costly.

If Nevadans are suspicious of Republican claims of “fiscal responsibility” it’s because they should be.

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Filed under Economy, Nevada economy, Politics

Happy Fourth of July: A More Perfect Union

Flag July 4th

It’s a good 4th of July weekend.  The benefits of citizenship have been affirmed for members of the LGBT community, but as the founders told us we’re on a path to create “a more perfect union.”  Therefore, there’s more work to be done to insure that housing, employment, and other areas of American life aren’t stumbling blocks of discrimination. We will have to keep up efforts toward building that “more perfect” union.

Ravenal Bridge

There may be some dead-enders, some battle flag flying remnants of blatant racism, but no matter how hard the Klan and their allies try, their proposed demonstration will be nothing compared to the thousands who walked along the Ravenal Bridge in Charleston, South Carolina.  We’re closer to being a nation of people who are taking Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s message to heart:

“When evil men plot, good men must plan.  When evil men burn and bomb, good men must build and bind.  When evil men shout ugly words of hatred, good men must commit themselves to the glories of love. “

At least two churches in the south have been the target of recent arson attacks, so in order to form that more perfect union it’s time for people of good will to build and bind.   It’s been a long walk from the bridge in Selma to the bridge in Charleston, but we’re getting there.  We still have to acknowledge the often painful accuracy of Winston Churchill’s backhanded compliment, “You can always count on the Americans to do the right thing, after they’ve tried everything else.”  

In a more perfect union, we’d not have maps showing that a person earning minimum wages cannot achieve a point at which only 30% of his income can pay for a one bedroom apartment.

Rent map

The darker the blue the worse the problem.  We’ll have a more perfect union when we address the complications of living on inadequate wages.  It does no good to march behind banners proclaiming that hard working Americans should “save for the future,” – when simply meeting basic needs for food, housing, and adequate clothing consume all the family’s income. It takes us no closer to a more perfect union to proclaim, “if the poor would just work harder they’d get ahead,” when elements of our judicial system, parts of our educational system, and the myopia of commerce combine to force workers into multiple jobs at minimal wages.  We are no closer to forming a more perfect union when we reward those who prosper at the expense of those who produce.

Unassisted graph

In a more perfect union this graph would be significantly lower.  How do we care for the least able among us? The learning disabled young man with nerve damage, but not quite enough to meet disability standards?  Unmarried, with no dependent children, unemployed except for odd jobs paying about $10 per hour?  A victim of child abuse, and now a victim of a system in which he doesn’t qualify for benefits because he’s never been able to find employment which sustains them. [Reuters]

We’ll be a more perfect union when we are more aware that the able-bodied are not necessarily able to fully function in our modern economy.  In a more perfect union there is more educational, job, housing, and food support for those who live on the margins of despair.

I look to the diffusion of light and education as the resource most to be relied on for ameliorating the condition, promoting the virtue and advancing the happiness of man.” Thomas Jefferson to Cornelius Blatchly, October 1822

And yet:

“About seven in 10 (69%) college seniors who graduated from public and private nonprofit colleges in 2013 had student loan debt. These borrowers owed an average of $28,400, up two percent compared to $27,850 for public and nonprofit graduates in 2012.   About one-fifth (19%) of the  Class of 2013’s debt was comprised of private loans, which are typically more costly and provide fewer consumer protections and repayment options than safer federal loans.”  [TICAS]

In a more perfect union, education advances the “happiness of man,” not merely the bottom line of banking institutions, and certainly not the unrestrained avarice of some for-profit operations who once having the federal funds in hand look to more recruitment without much concern for those already recruited.

And, then – predictably – there’s the Wall Street Casino, which has created SLABS (Student Loan Asset Based Securities).  While certainly not in the mortgage meltdown class, these are problematic because:

“What I find most disturbing about SLABS is that they create a system where an increase in tuition (and the debt-burden on the borrower) equals an increased profit for the investor. When you consider the role that unscrupulous speculators played in the mortgage crisis, one can’t help but wonder if a similar over-valuation of college tuition is taking place for the benefit of SLABS investors. With the cost of attending college increasing nearly 80% between 2003-2013 while wages have decreased, it’s no wonder that so many people are having difficulty paying off their student loans.” [MDA]

This situation is NOT the way to “diffuse light and education.”

There are countless other topics and issues on which we might dwell, assistance for the elderly, transportation, trade, economic security, police and community relations, infrastructure issues, voting rights,  domestic terrorism, domestic violence, gun violence, climate change … the list is  as long as the population rolls, as we try to create that more perfect union of imperfect human beings.

What we need is Churchill’s optimism – that eventually, after avoiding problems, exacerbating problems, tinkering with problems – we’ll do the right thing.

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Filed under banking, civil liberties, education, financial regulation, Global warming, homelessness, income inequality, Minimum Wage, poverty, racism