Tag Archives: Trump trade policy

Meanwhile Back With My Soy Beans and an Orange Blossom Who Can’t Shoot Straight

So, here’s from the Farm Report:

Soybeans are lower, breaking the support line from their three-day rally overnight. Traders will continue to scour today’s export data for clue on how foreign buyers are responding to the bargains created by Chinese tariffs. Sales are expected to rise after disappointing results last week. Vegetable oil markets in Asia were lower today, losing around a fifth of a cent per pound.  September soybean oil futures in China fell to 36.844 cents and September palm oil futures in Malaysia were at 24.473 cents.

and on soy beans in particular

If production doesn’t swell too much, November futures may try to hold the $8 level into the August report. USDA put the bottom of its average cash price for the 2018 crop at $8, a level already reached in many local markets around the country. It’s still a $2 climb back to profitability. But most growers appear to have priced a good chunk of their expected production when offered a good price this winter and spring.

Hold this thought — $8.00 per for soy bean farmers or — it’s a really bad year down on the farm. “USDA’s July 12 monthly report put a number on the lost revenue farmers face: $325 million in new crop sales. That number is based on the amount the agency lowered its price range for crop, 75 cents a bushel.” [WSR]  Soy bean prices are about $8.55, nearly a ten year low. [CNN money]

All right, it’s not that I am in the soy bean business. It’s not that I expect ANY reader of this blog to have any more connection to soy beans than the occasional purchase of soy milk.  It’s that the little beans are a metaphor, an anchor, a data point, to watch the inexplicable economic idiocy of the current administration ensconced in the Oval Office.

Those slap dash, ham-fisted, wild west, off the cuff, distributive bargaining ploy, grandiose threats and counter threats being on offer from the mis-administration in lieu of any real coordinated trade strategy and policy have real world consequences for real world people — people like Iowa soy bean farmers who can’t take the hit if soy bean prices drop below $6.00.  Did we notice all those “ifs” and assumptions in the USDA pricing report?  Like automobile manufacturers in South Carolina who don’t have to take a hit if moving export production to friendlier climes will put money back into their bottom lines.  Like household appliance manufacturers who thought tariffs were such a lovely idea when they were on Samsung and LG, but on steel and aluminum not so much.

We have a *President who can’t get to “yes.”  He couldn’t get to “yes,” on a health care bill and ended up with a bill he didn’t want.  He couldn’t get to “yes” on a DACA bill, and no one’s ended up with anything at all.  He couldn’t get to “yes” on immigration policy, and ended up with a court order to reunite families in which he, in all likelihood, cannot make yet another deadline.  He can’t get to “yes” on NAFTA terms with Mexico and Canada.  He can’t get to “yes” with Asian regional trade and commerce agreements.  He just can’t get to “yes.”

My way or the highway distributive bargaining works when I want to purchase a vehicle and there are 15 dealerships in a 50 mile radius.  As noted before, the bottom line is the “walk away” point. However, there is no other China, no other Mexico, no other Canada, no other European Union, no other United Kingdom, no other Germany, no other Japan, no other France, no other Brazil.  There is no Walking Away point because there is no other place to walk to.

The price of soy beans (or cars, refrigerators, beer cans, or washing machines) cannot be determined by simply yelling at the dealer, threatening to bludgeon him with penalties,  loudly pronouncing another salvo of letters to the editor about their poor service, and later threatening to sue for ‘false’ something or another.  We have a global economy based on supply and demand principles which Orange Blossom pretends to understand, but which he provides scant evidence thereof.

And NOW he wants to weigh in (at over 239 pounds) on what the Federal Reserve should be doing with interest rates!  [CNBC]

Will someone, anyone, please take him down to that portion of the White House where the last evidence of the fire set by British troops on August 24, 1814 remains, lock him there, quietly close whatever doors are behind him — or at least make him SHUT THE H___ UP?

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