Thank You For Your Service, Maybe?

PTSD There’s a difference between Militarism and Supporting Our Military.  There is also a difference between being militaristic and being supportive of our nation’s service members and veterans.  A militarist tends to regard military efficiency as the best ideal of the state, and to subordinate all other interests to those of the military services. [DictRef]  Now that the terms are defined, why do conservatives have such a difficult time comprehending the problems created when they call for a “strong” Department of Defense, and a “strong” nation, or a “strong” foreign policy, and almost simultaneously disparage the members of the military and veterans when those people express their needs?

The latest manifestation of this issue comes from radio talker Michael Savage, who offered his opinion on Armed Forces members and veterans who are suffering with PTSD:

“If the whole nation is told, ‘boo-hoo-hoo, come and get a medication, come and get treatment, talk about mental illness,’ you know what you wind up with? You wind up with Obama in the White House and lawyers in every phase of the government, that’s what you wind up with. It’s a weak, sick nation. A weak, sick, broken nation.” [...] “You need men like me to save the country,” he said. “You need men to stand up and say stop crying like a baby over everything.” He continued that “men are so weak and so narcissistic” that it is “no wonder ISIS can defeat our military.” [Savage/RRW]

It Helps To Know What You’re Talking About

Mr. Savage must know what he’s doing; he must know that there’s an audience for this kind of nonsense.   First, it is obvious Mr. Savage has absolutely no personal military experience.  Had he any experience he’d know the truth of the old adage: A war leaves no one unwounded.  He was about 26 at the height of the war in Vietnam, but didn’t serve.  Nonetheless, he’s certain the nation needs “men like me to save the country.”

Shut Up and Shoot Yourself?

Secondly, the fossilized notions about mental illness embedded in Savage’s rant are appalling.  If a person seeks treatment for mental health issues, then he is “weak, sick, and broken?”  Savage/Weiner couldn’t have crafted a more blatant recipe for further weakening injured individuals.  Again, even a cursory familiarity with the U.S. military would demonstrate the Department of Defense takes PTSD very seriously, in fact there’s been the establishment of the Defense Centers of Excellence – for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.  

In August 2013, the DoD, the Veterans Administration, and other agencies created a joint research program to study PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injuries. [Defense.Gov]  One element of the study will be a collaboration to study the factors influencing the chronic effects of mild TBI in order to improve diagnostic and treatment options, keying on a better understanding of the relationship between TBI and neurodegenerative disease.   No “boo hoo hoo” here, simply a directive from the Department of Defense and the White House that we take a serious scientific look at nature and treatment which ought to be available to any of the 2.5 million U.S. service members who have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan since September 2001 and need mental health treatment.

The conception that “real men (and women) don’t cry” or that “real men (and women) don’t want to be stigmatized as having a mental health issue is dangerous in and of itself.  During a presentation for the American Psychiatric Association in 2012 it was noted that fewer than half the soldiers who reported combat related PTSD received the necessary care, and of those who participate in a treatment program between 20% and 50% will stop before the treatment is complete.  When 93% of Army infantrymen have come under fire from rockets, artillery, or mortars, and when 91% report having been ambushed or attacked, and 87% report they know someone who has been seriously injured or killed, then it’s obvious some form of scientifically based treatment programs will need to be in place to assist those who develop PTSD. [Stripes]

There’s no “boo-hoo-hoo” factor when a mental health issue, such as PTSD,  produces intrusive memories, flashbacks, nightmares, avoidance symptoms, negative feelings about self and others, inability to experience positive emotions, feeling of emotional numbness, feelings of hopelessness, memory problems, difficulty in maintaining close relationships, anger and irritability, overwhelming guilt or shame, self destructive behaviors, problems with concentration, problems with insomnia, difficulties created by being easily startled or frightened.  [MayoClinic]

This is serious stuff.  While the rates for civilian suicides remained steady at 19:100,ooo over the period of a recent study for the National Institute of Mental Health, the Army suicide rate – historically lower than the civilian rate – surpassed it in 2008 and kept climbing, until it finally dropped a bit in 2012-13.  [USAT]  What is Savage/Weiner advocating? Is his message so divorced from reality that it’s little more than “Just Shut Up and Shoot Yourself?”

An Alternative Universe of Memory

Mr. Savage/Weiner evidently defines ‘manhood’ in antediluvian terms.  Men back in the good old days were Real Men, and women knew how to act like ladies?  This TV scripted perspective never existed in any real form. Mr. Savage/Weiner seems stuck in a wonderland of Leave it to Beaver, and Ozzie and Harriet.  His definition of masculinity sounds more like an interpretation of a John Wayne movie script.  It certainly isn’t Bogart sending Bergman off in Casablanca, or Sidney Poitier in Raisin in the Sun. It most certainly isn’t ultimate slacker Hoffman in The Graduate. [NPR]  Nor is it to be found in Gregory Peck’s performance in To Kill a Mockingbird.  And, merciful heavens, it must not be anywhere near the comedic rendition from Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in Some Like It Hot.  The hard sad truth is that Mr. Savage/Weiner’s interpretation never even existed in Hollywood outside the genre of stock war movies and derivative westerns.

If Mr. Savage/Weiner is reaching about 3 million Americans with his entertainments,  about 1% of the population, then why waste pixels and print?  Because, his views energize some of the least attractive and least socially useful elements in our national repertoire of ideas.  Surely, nothing is less useful than militaristically bantering about the glories and barbarities of war, while disparaging those who come home from it  to the nightmare of PTSD.

Talk Without Money

Perhaps this isn’t such a far fetched perspective when placed in proximity to the Republican budget proposals of the recent past.  Flags, color guards, pomp and circumstance are all part of the 4th of July atmosphere attached to political performances.  However, when it comes down to the money, the appropriations for Veterans’ services life gets stickier. 

The lack of specificity in budgets crafted by Representative Paul Ryan make it very difficult to predict what the impact of his budget slashing might be, especially in the short term.  Rep. Ryan once referred to budget cuts in cost of living formulas for retired service-members as a “modest adjustment to a particularly generous program.” [WaPo]  Other modest adjustments were considered:

“The House Budget Committee, chaired by Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), has told a veterans’ group it is studying a plan to save $6 billion annually in VA health care costs by cancelling enrollment of any veteran who doesn’t have a service-related medical condition and is not poor.

Committee Republicans, searching for ways to curb federal deficits and rein in galloping VA costs, are targeting 1.3 million veterans who claim priority group 7 or 8 status and have access to VA care.” [vmusa]

In other words, “No matter what we told you about taking care of you if you volunteered to take care of our country, if we can cut back on government spending at your expense we’ll do it.”  A veteran with a priority group 7 or 8 status is on his or her own – no matter how many paeans were offered and “thank you’s for your service” rendered.

Since when did we decide, as a nation, that a veteran is not really a veteran if he or she is in the “wrong category” and is thereby less worthy of a nation’s gratitude?

How much difference is there between the hate-radio talker who disparages the mental illnesses exacerbated or triggered by combat experience and the impact of that experience on a returning veteran, and the casual elimination of veterans’ benefits from selected categories merely to satisfy the “drown the government in a bathtub” crowd?

There is a point at which it must be acknowledged that militarism creates veterans, and promises to those veterans should be kept.

Leave a comment

Filed under Afghanistan, conservatism, Defense Department, Foreign Policy, Health Care, Iraq

Here Comes The Dark Money

Dark Money Here comes the money – into the Nevada District 4 Congressional race:

“Crossroads GPS, a conservative group, said Tuesday it has bought $820,000 worth of TV time for ads to start airing today and run through Election Day on Nov. 4. A source familiar with the ad buy said it is aimed at Horsford, who represents the 4th Congressional District.

Paul Lindsay, communications director for Crossroads GPS, confirmed the group’s eleventh-hour spending plans for the campaign, which could be a game-changer, but offered no details.

“We have placed a buy in the Las Vegas media market and have an important message to communicate,” Lindsay said.” [LVRJ]

And what might the “important message” be? It’s that Representative Horsford is in the same political party as the President of the United States.  Horsford, the ads explain, supports the Affordable Care Act.  Yes, that’s the law which restrains some of the more egregious practices of health insurance corporations, requires that comprehensive insurance cover flu vaccinations, and autism screening, and makes shopping for private health care plans more convenient.   Then there’s the almost an outright lie.

The Affordable Care Act cut Medicare.” This prevarication has been one of the pillars of Republican opposition to the Affordable Care Act.  Those “cuts” actually: (1) Close the do-nut hole in Medicare Part D prescription coverage until the ‘hole’ is eliminated in 2020; (2) Expands existing coverage for senior citizens; (3) Supports initiatives to support care coordination; (4) Does not reduce benefits from Medicare Advantage (the private option to Medicare); (5) Reduces payments to Medicare Advantage rewarding those providers who improve the quality of their coverage, bringing payouts in line with other areas of Medicare; (6) Helps protect the Medicare trust fund.  [OFacts]

The “cuts” were made to over-payments to Medicare Advantage providers which were higher than payments made to Medicare providers – in essence supplying the private Medicare option with a public corporate subsidy. “Your” Medicare (Advantage) benefits weren’t cut!  What was cut were unjustifiable taxpayer subsidies to private health insurance corporations.   And, maybe we should be reminded that those same “cuts” about which Rove’s Dark Money ads are caterwauling, are the same “cuts” which appear in  Representative Paul Ryan’s budget plans?

Someone doesn’t like “cuts” made to the public funds available to private health care insurance corporations.  Who might that be? We’ll not know because Crossroads is a Dark Money 501 (c) 4 which doesn’t have to reveal the names of its donors. [IBT]  There’s nothing grass-roots about Rove’s organization which takes advantage of the decision in Citizens United to cover the tracks of mega-donors.

“The large donations may renew questions from Sunlight and others about whether Crossroads GPS should be able to file as a nonprofit “social welfare” group under the tax code, allowing it to avoid disclosing donor names. According to IRS regulations, the group’s “primary purpose” cannot be influencing elections, but the group can spend up to half of its money on political campaigning.” [WaPo] (emphasis added)

This goes toward explaining why the GOP was so anxious to attack the IRS for “politicizing” 501 (c) organization decisions?  There are legitimate questions about the “social welfare” activities of organizations like Crossroads GPS, and someone didn’t want those questions answered.

Republicans may see an opening in Nevada District 4 and are willing to unleash the Dark Side Money into the breach. We can hope that the constituent services, and the person campaign style of incumbent Representative Stephen Horsford can overcome the money accreting to the Tea Party Radical campaign of challenger Cresent “Segregation” Hardy.  [NVProg]

Early voting has started, and the GOP base is out in force – as usual – Every. Vote. Counts. GOTV.

Leave a comment

Filed under Nevada politics, Rove

Fear mongering is hazardous to our health

Halloween Mask Finally, a headline making some sense: “Washoe health official: Worry about the flu not Ebola.”

“(Washoe County Health Officer) Dick said the “media barrage and sensationalism has frightened people,” emphasizing that medical responders are the ones who need to be trained and prepared.

“We are straining resources across my agency and the hospitals are ramping up and getting prepared for the training and drilling,” Dick said. “The community can help by getting a flu shot and not showing up at the emergency rooms with flu-like symptoms.”

That’s right – FLU – good old fashioned influenza.  And, no, we don’t have exact figures on the numbers of people in the United States who succumb to influenza each year because (1) the states aren’t required to report such cases in individuals over the age of 18; (2) the disease isn’t noted on death certificates very often; and (3) death may result from associated illnesses such as bacterial pneumonia well after the flu infection. [CDC] The CDC can offer some context, and report from 2012 studies that there are about 1,532 deaths from influenza a year, and that about 45.2% of youngsters 6 months to 17 years old have gotten a flu shot, while only about 26.3% of adults 18-49 have done so.  Adults 50-64 have a better rate, at 42.7%, and those over 65 have a 66.5% vaccination rate.  [CDC]

If these figures say anything, it’s that we’re less likely to get flu from those little Germ Bags who crawl on carpeting or share the contents of soda pop cans with alarming alacrity than we are from the “adults” in the room – except for Granny, who’s on Medicare and gets her flu shot without a hassle.

And here’s the part where the Affordable Care Act comes into play.

If a family enrolled in a new health care insurance plan on or after September 23, 2010 the plan will be required to cover recommended vaccinations without charging a deductible, copayment, or coinsurance.  This means FLU shots.  [HHS]

The CDC provides a schedule of vaccinations adults should receive, which is available in almost any format from PDF to an app for your Smartphone.  Because of the Affordable Care Act, influenza, tetanus, etc. vaccinations must be covered in comprehensive health insurance plans. Now, does anyone want to discuss “repealing the Affordable Care Act?”

And here’s the part wherein pure stupidity comes into play.

There were school closings and/or panics in Texas, Ohio, and Maine… because “Ebola.” [NYT] [Denver]  It seems a teacher from beautiful downtown Strong, Maine (Google that one) went to a conference in Dallas, Texas and has been asked to take a 21 day paid leave of absence. Let’s review. The immediate family of the man who died from the disease in Dallas has been cleared, having passed the time limit without infection – so a teacher who attended a conference across town is on leave?

There are continuous calls for a travel ban with west Africa. Which goes nowhere toward explaining why a musical group from Kenya (EAST Africa!) had a U.S. performance cancelled. Actually, the travel ban blather says more about the intrinsic American problem locating anything or anyone on a map than about a sentient reaction to a world health problem.

We’re going to stop flights from Freetown, Sierra Leone? What flights from Freetown?  The flights go through Casablanca (Morocco) and Brussels (Belgium) [VSL.org] Or, stop flights to and from Monrovia, Liberia?  Flights from Monrovia, Liberia to New York make stops in Casablanca, Montreal, Paris, and  Madrid [TripAdv]  A “flight ban” makes absolutely no sense – unless it’s being advocated that we stop flights from Brussels, Casablanca, Montreal, Paris, and Madrid.

What we could do instead of getting all panicky?

#1. Provide funding for the CDC and the National Institutes of Health to conduct research into the Ebola disease (and others) and increase funding for programs which improve local and state emergency preparedness, for both natural and man-made disasters.

#2. Stop worrying about who the “czar” is …and start worrying about when the Senate of the U.S. might confirm the next Surgeon General. 

#3. Provide funding for medical relief activities in countries such as Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone, which will help curb the disease in place.

#4. Get a flu shot and don’t run to the ER with the sniffles.

#5. Vote for candidates who promise to do numbers 1-3.

Leave a comment

Filed under Health Care, health insurance

Halloween Shocker

Laxalt Or, perhaps not.  The Laxalt Family pulls the plug on support for Adam Laxalt’s candidacy for Attorney General.  [Las Vegas Sun]

It has to hurt when it comes from the family?

“It is our belief that Ross Miller’s documented history of pulling himself up by his own bootstraps and establishing a well-respected career in law and public service while still maintaining a strong sense of family and community constitute the critical characteristics needed for Nevada’s highest legal office.”

Once again we’re treated to the spectacle of the Nevada Republican Party unable to keep the members of the Old Guard aligned with the Tea Party influx of fringe characters from the radical right.   There are Nevada Republicans who aren’t pleased with the antics of the Bundy Family, and who aren’t in ideological lock step with the pseudo-libertarian radicals.  There are Nevada Republicans for whom vote suppression is not a recipe for winning hearts, minds, and votes.  However, it will be a struggle for them to take their party back from the reactionaries and radicals who have provided candidates in some of the last elections.  They are afraid of some of their own, meaning independents and Democrats should be equally alarmed.

Happy Halloween?

Comments Off

Filed under Politics

The Halloween Campaign Season

Halloween House It’s always great fun when Halloween and Mid Term Elections converge.   Or, as comedian Jon Stewart puts it, “We’ve got nothing to fear, but fear itself, so we’re going with fear.”   If I were really getting into the spirit of the campaign/Halloween season I’d put the Halloween candy up on the roof, take down the ladder and lock it up in the shed, and then tell the kiddies that if they are patient, hard working, diligent, and patriotic some day the candy will trickle down to their eager little mitts.

However, since I’m definitely not a Republican, the candy will stay on the porch where everyone gets a shot at it.   So, what’s scary this season?

Halloween Pumpkin

It’s three pumpkin scary that there are still a large number of voters who are clinging to the failed and long debunked hoax that what is good for Wall Street is necessarily good for Main Street.   Wall Street, and the financialists therein,  love the witches brew of mergers and acquisitions – whether the companies involved are actually improved or gutted – and tales of layoffs, off-shoring, and other devices to reduce costs and improve “shareholder value.”  Anything which reduces the expenses is received with joy, such as not paying their share of taxes by using accounting tricks and the ever popular Inversions.  

So, when faced with the probability that they might have to contribute their fair share or face their responsibilities, the corporate shills resort to dragging out their well rehearsed talking points – taxes cost jobs, the wealthy create jobs, taxes make us less ‘competitive,’ and regulations are a burden.  These lines are just so much mush in the core of an over-ripe pumpkin.

The good folks on Main Street and Elm Street are left holding the bag, every time a multi-national corporation plays games with the tax system Main Street and Elm Street have to foot the bills for roads, infrastructure, education, national defense, and health services.  

Halloween Pumpkin

Another three scary pumpkins for a political system so cynical that cheating is required to win.  There’s NO epidemic of voter impersonation fraud in this country.  An analysis of 2,068 cases of fraud in the entire nation since 2000 revealed that there were only 10 cases of voter impersonation fraud. There are approximately 146,000,000 registered voters in this country.  Do the arithmetic.  Your calculation should result in an answer of 6.84e-8.  (If that “e-8” is throwing you, just remember to move the decimal point place 8 places to the left.)

However, that infinitesimally small number hasn’t stopped candidates from advocating Photo ID laws, the purpose of which  is to reduce the number of the elderly, the young, the ethnic minorities, and the women at the polling stations.   We even have our very own Vote Suppressionist running to be the chief election officer (Secretary of State) in Nevada.  Voting suppression bills are enacted because voters buy into the fear-mongering about fraud, and the utterly illogical personalization talking point, “Would you want your vote to be canceled out by a fraud?”   The answer, of course, is “no,” but the odds against this actually happening are literally astronomical.

Halloween Pumpkin

It’s also three pumpkins scary we have media outlets which cater to the least attractive  human characteristics – like, fear and what it does to otherwise rational beings.   Yes, what the Islamic State proposes to do in Iraq and Syria is serious stuff, but remember the odds of being killed in a terrorist attack are 1:20,000,000.   The terrorists would no doubt like to get us sufficiently agitated so that we’d agree to send troops to their region, which would make it ever so much easier to kill Americans. 

And yes, the Ebola virus is a nasty little bug. However, it tends to thrive in places where medical facilities are both rare and not well regulated.  It seems to prefer places with inadequate sanitation infrastructure.  Thus far that does not describe the public health systems in North America and western Europe.  What should concern us more than the incidents are questions about how our privatized health care delivery services are to regulated in order to prevent outbreaks of any infectious disease.

There is an old bit of business advice which says, “You can’t control what you don’t own.”  We can apply the adage to public health care facilities.  Government standards can be enforced in public facilities, whereas under the current system of corporate health care standards come in the form of guidelines – the implementation of which may not be as uniform as we’d like. One relatively recent report says that public hospitals declined by 27% in major suburban areas from 1996 to 2002, and by 16% in major cities.  [AmMedNews]  Are standards of accreditation strong enough to maintain a level of health care practices in which the environment is safe for both the patients and the medical staff?  This question leads to our next set of pumpkins.

Halloween Pumpkin There ought to be three scary pumpkins awarded to the advocates of de-regulation.  The exploiters, polluters, and “shareholder value” advocates have been beating drums about “burdensome regulations” since the corporate interests organized their campaigns to repeal any law which impinged on their profits.  For example, since January 2011 the House of Representatives have voted 297 times to weaken public health and environmental protections. [CWA]  

Though the Enron Debacle seems a distant memory from 2002, the Republicans are still trying to repeal the Sarbanes-Oxley Act which sought to curb the abuses that allowed the scam to spread through the financial sector.  Opponents of financial regulation are still calling for the Act’s amendment or outright repeal in spite of the benefits stemming from its enforcement.   The Dodd Frank Act, enacted in the wake of yet more financial sector abuse, and the cavorting in the Wall Street Casino leading to the Housing Bubble disaster,  passed its 4th anniversary with more calls from the GOP to repeal it.

It would be remiss not to mention the REINS Act again.  This bit of legislation from the House is a de-regulator’s wet dream, and everyone else’s nightmare.  Congress would have to approve any and every regulation set forth by any agency of the federal government – environmental, financial, and (compliments of the Smith Amendment) public health. [See H.R. 367] Representative Jason T. Smith (R-MO8) offered amendment #450 which included all regulations under the Affordable Care Act.  This is as good a time as any to see what Representative Smith’s amendment would do in terms of hospital regulations.

Section 3025 of the ACA outlined a “readmission reduction program” which penalizes hospitals which have readmission rates higher than acceptable.  The idea was to get hospitals to use Best Practices (pdf) to reduce the readmission rate for cardiac patients, those who were at risk of being readmitted because of a lack of resources, and those who might show signs of infections after initial hospitalization.   Now, imagine the members of the House of Representatives “de-regulating” hospitals which have high readmission rates by refusing to approve the CMS standards.   That’s more money in the coffers of the 81% of Alabama hospitals which have been penalized; 82% of the hospitals in Arkansas which have been penalized; 89% of the hospitals in Illinois which have been penalized; and the 153 hospitals in Texas (out of 322) which have been penalized. [Kaiser]

Want to get scared again?  There’s credible research suggesting that hospital acquired infections affect the readmission rate [AmMedNews] and hence the regulations from Section 3025 relate to hospital sanitation practices and the prevention of hospital acquired infections.  Now, grab the remote and try to find a cable news channel that isn’t overloading the airwaves about Ebola. Quiver again, while thinking that Representative Smith’s little amendment could remove the incentive for corporately owned hospitals to literally clean up their acts.

Halloween Pumpkin

Instead of being fearful, let’s enjoy the Halloween season with thoughts of increasing the minimum wage and adding about $22 billion to our gross domestic product. [TP]  Or, we could think about further reducing our dependence on foreign oil by encouraging more solar power research, and ending the $4 billion annual subsidy paid by taxpayers to highly profitable Giant Oil Companies.  Or, we could think of reducing the burden on college students by allowing them to renegotiate or refinance student loans.  We could start by insuring students aren’t required to repay more than 10% of their annual income. [WH] We could improve the Voting Right Act and insure that everyone, in every state has an equal opportunity to cast his or her ballot.  We could enact legislation to require equal pay for equal work, improving family financial situations across the country.  We could employ people in our construction sector by starting to work on our infrastructure issues – our airports, dams, bridges, water lines, wastewater facilities, and  levees could all use some work.  [ASCE]  We could enact reasonable gun safety legislation.  And we could enact legislation to insure there’s no discrimination of any kind in American commerce.

The scary part is that none of these things will get started, much less accomplished, with Republicans sowing fear and discomfort – belaboring spooky apparitions like “Benghazzziiiii,” or “IRSssssss,” or “ISISssssss,” or other specters, wraiths, and spirits.   It’s Halloween after all, and  those are manufactured phantoms, nor more material than the costumes available at any big box store.   Instead of focusing on the Spooks of October, we ought to be enthusiastic about the opportunities in November, such as electing people to state and national offices who aren’t afraid of their own shadows.

1 Comment

Filed under Economy, financial regulation, Health Care, Iraq, terrorism, Vote Suppression, Voting

The Realtors Are Coming: Nevada’s Question Three

The Realtors Against Question 3, related to the Alliance for Property Protection Rights, related to the National Association of Realtors, related to Nevada Data Mine LLC, would like for me to vote “no” on Nevada’s ballot Question 3.  Oh hark! The fear mongering begins. Today’s mail includes my second mailer from their offices at 760 Margrave Drive, Reno, and it tells me:

Thousands of Nevadans would lose their jobs. Employers would have to pay the tax on total revenue, even if they have no profits and are losing money.”  Really?

Here’s the real Question 3: Shall the Nevada Revised Statutes be amended to create a 2% tax to be imposed on a margin of the gross revenue of entities doing business in Nevada whose total revenue for any taxable year exceeds $1 million, with the proceeds of the tax going to the State Distributive School Account to be apportioned among Nevada’s school districts and charter schools?

So, some firm doing more than $1 million worth of business in this state might be “profit-less, or losing money?”  That isn’t a tax problem – it’s a lousy management issue.  If the firm’s total revenue exceeds $1 million, and the taxable margin is determined by taking the lesser of (a) 70% of the entity’s total revenue; or (b) the entity’s total revenue minus the cost of goods sold or the amount of compensation paid to its owners and employees – then if a 2% margin tax would put the outfit out of business I think we could reasonably expect the enterprise is already doomed.  But wait, the second item is pure doom and gloom:

It would devastate future job growth in the state. This would be one of the largest tax increases in Nevada’s history, making us less competitive with neighboring states like California.”  Devastate?

This is nothing more than the superannuated argument that lower taxes mean more economic growth.   So, let’s look at our neighboring state.  California was looking at a $60 billion budget deficit when the Housing Bubble/Wall Street Fiasco exploded, by using a combination of budget cuts and tax increases it had a budget surplus as of 2013. [USAT] In 2012 California’s GDP growth was 3.5%.  As of 2013 it improved by another 2%. [BEA] Nevada’s rate YOY 2012-2013? 1.0%.  Thus much for the anti-tax argument.  And, while we’re at it – just once could some organization NOT employ the hyperbolic “Biggest Most Gigantic Extra Colossal Humongous Tax Increase Ever” ploy? That’s getting even more hirsute than the anti-tax argument.

The Legislature would be able to divert funds to anything, not just education. It’s a blank check for politicians with no oversight or accountability.”  Obviously,  we DO need to put more money into our educational programs because these people can’t read.

What part of “with the proceeds of the tax going to the State Distributive School Account to be apportioned among Nevada’s school districts and charter schools” isn’t comprehensible?  Granted the vocabulary is about at the 12th grade level, but this shouldn’t be an obstacle to people used to reading real estate contracts?   But, there’s more:

Increased costs would be passed on to your family. All of us would soon pay more for healthcare, food, clothing, gas, water, and housing.” Oh please!

All business expenses are passed along the economic food chain. They always have been.  Imagine becoming worked up into a lather because the price of cocoa has increased to a three year high?  Merciful Heavens, it’s up to $3,185 a ton.  [WSJ]  This cost will surely be passed along to candy bar consumers! Oh, the horror.  However, how much more might we be paying if employees had to find private education, or private security, or private fire protection services, or pay for toll roads… Get the picture?  At it’s core, the APPR argument says that any and all pass-along expenses are bad for us, without, of course, offering any substantiation for the assumption.  It’s more logical to argue that the economic benefits of better public educational services are at least commensurate with any pass-along expenses we might incur as consumers.   We do know from both statistical and experiential information that better schools = higher property values for homeowners; [DukeEdu]  just as better police and fire protection contribute to the value of residential property.

And, this leads us to wonder – why are real estate interests so dead set against a business margin tax increase?

Comments Off

Filed under Nevada economy, Nevada politics, nevada taxation

Republicans are a Public Health Hazard

 

Health Hazard

Just Saying… Nevada early voting begins on October 18, 2014. Register, and vote.

Comments Off

Filed under health, Health Care