Tag Archives: Health Care

It’s Official: GOP Hates Women — Scamcare Edition

In case there’s anyone left who thinks the Republican Party is representing the needs of women in this country, the contradiction is right in front of us in the form of the Graham-Cassidy+Heller (tagging along) bill.

Amy Friedrich-Karnik, senior federal policy adviser at the Center for Reproductive Rights, pointed to a statistic from progressive think tank the Century Foundation that estimates 13 million women will lose access to maternity care services if the ACA is repealed. Friedrich-Karnik explained that the bill also blocks Medicaid patients from using Planned Parenthood, which bars access to essential preventative care like birth control, cancer screenings, and STD testing and treatment. “It also slashes Medicaid overall and into the future, and so really impacting particularly low-income women and women of color who rely on Medicaid broadly for their health care,” she said. According to the Kaiser Health Network, Medicaid pays for nearly half of all births in America and covers family planning services for 13.5 million women. [Jez]

Not only is the bill a golf ball shot to the back of the head for Nevada women, it could cost the state some $250 million in funding:

Specifically, the proposal would eliminate the marketplace subsidies and federal dollars that states that chose to opt-in to Medicaid expansion under the ACA, like Nevada, currently receive, replacing them with block grants to be doled out to states, which would be left with the responsibility of deciding how to spend that money. It also converts almost the entire Medicaid program to a per capita cap, under which the federal government would set a limit on how much it reimburses states per enrollee, and allows states to waiver certain provisions from the ACA that require insurance companies to cover certain services and bars them from placing annual or lifetime caps on coverage. [NVInd]

Got that? Nevada gets a per capita cap, AND insurance corporations could refuse to cover pre-existing conditions, maternity care, family planning, women’s health care services, AND the corporations could revert to that wonderful old scam — the lifetime limit on coverage.  This isn’t as bad as the former “skinny” bill — it’s worse.

Senator Heller might have wanted to give this version some thought before he inked his name on the paperwork to co-sponsor the bill, but he didn’t.

It’s understandable that Nevadans are tiring of calling, writing, and sign making, but if Republicans are nothing else they are persistent.  They’re counting on public apathy, ignorance, and fatigue.  Not this time. Not on American health care. Not on our watch.

Senator Heller’s Washington DC office number is 202-224-6244.  Calls are tallied, and at some point the number of calls opposing this iteration of scam-care needs to impinge on the amount of money Republicans are counting on from the Koch Brothers and other right wing radicals.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Medicaid, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

The Moderate Heller Myth: Health Insurance Edition

Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) has cultivated his “moderate” image to the point that this adjective is attached to him with remarkable consistency — when if a person does even a perfunctory piece of research on his actual voting record what emerges is the model of a hard line conservative.  There is a pattern.  The Senator expresses “concerns” with a bill; then announces with ranging degrees of fanfare his opposition to a bill “in its current form,” then when the rubber grinds on the road surface the Senator votes along with the Republican leadership.

Why would anyone seriously believe he would support fixing the Affordable Care Act’s problems and not ultimately support what is now being called the “skinny repeal” version in the Senate based on the following voting record:

In 2007 then Representative Heller voted against the Medicare Prescription Drug Price Negotiation Act (HR 4).  Then on August 1, 2007 he voted against HR 3162, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program reauthorization.  The next day he voted against HR 734, the Prescription Drug Imports bill.  On March 5, 2008 he voted against HR 1424, the Mental Health Coverage bill.  Further into 2008 he voted “no” on HR 5501, the bill to fund programs fighting AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis, and “no” again on the concurrence version of the bill in July.   If he had a ‘flash’ of moderation during this period it happened in the summer of 2008 when he voted in favor of HR 5613 (Medicaid extensions and changes), HR 6631 (Medicare), the latter including a vote to override the President’s veto.  By November 2009 he was back in full Conservative mode.

He voted against HR 3962 (Health Care and Insurance Law amendments) on November 8, 2009, and HR 3961 (Revising Medicare Physician Fee Schedules and re-establishing PAYGO) on November 19, 2009.

In March 2010 Heller voted against HR 4872 (Health Care Reconciliation Act), and HR 3590 (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act).  He also voted against the concurrence bills.

January 19, 2011 he voted in favor of the Repealing the Health Care bill (HR 2).  He also signaled his stance on Planned Parenthood when he voted in favor of H.Amdt. 95 (Prohibiting the use of Federal funds for Planned Parenthood) on February 18, 2011.    He was in favor of repealing the individual mandate (HR 4), of repealing the Prevention and Public Health Fund (HR 1217).  May 4, 2011 he voted to repeal funding of the construction of school based health centers (HR 1214).

There was another “soft” period in some of his initial Senate votes in 2011, especially concerning the importation of medication from Canada (interesting since many prescription drugs are manufactured in other overseas sites).  See S. Amdt 769, S. Amdt 2111, and S. Amdt 2107 in May 2012.  On March 31, 2014 he voted in favor of HR 4302 (Protecting Access to Medicare).

He was back riding the Republican rails in September 2015, supporting an amendment to defund Planned Parenthood, (S. Amdt 2669) which failed a cloture vote.   Then on December 3, 2015 he voted in favor of another ACA repeal bill (HR 3762).    If we’re looking for patterns in this record they aren’t too difficult to discern. (1) Senator Heller can be relied upon to vote in favor of any legislation which deprives Planned Parenthood of funding for health care services, (2) Senator Heller can be relied upon to vote in favor of repealing the Affordable Care Act, and (3) Senator Heller’s voting record, if it illustrates any ‘moderation’ at all, comes in the form of dealing with prescription drug prices, but even that is a mixed bag of votes.

Thus, when he makes comments like the following:

“Obamacare isn’t the answer, but doing nothing to try to solve the problems it has created isn’t the answer either,” the statement read. “That is why I will vote to move forward and give us a chance to address the unworkable aspects of the law that have left many Nevadans — particularly those living in rural areas — with dwindling or no choices.

“Whether it’s my ideas to protect Nevadans who depend on Medicaid or the Graham-Cassidy proposal that empowers states and repeals the individual and employer mandates, there are commonsense solutions that could improve our health care system and today’s vote gives us the opportunity to fight for them. If the final product isn’t improved for the state of Nevada, then I will not vote for it; if it is improved, I will support it.”

We should examine them with some caution.   If he is referring to rural Nevada voters as ‘victims’ of the Affordable Care Act he might want to note that before the ACA there was one insurer in the northern Nevada rural market and if there is only one now that’s really not much of a change, much less a “nightmare.”  Nor is he mentioning that the proposed cuts to Medicaid will have a profoundly negative effect on rural Nevada hospitals. [DB previous]

That Graham-Cassidy proposal isn’t exactly a winner either:

“The new plan released Thursday morning and written by Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Bill Cassidy (La.) would block grant about $500 billion of federal spending to the states over 10 years to either repeal, repair or keep their ObamaCare programs.”

We have no idea if the number is an accurate estimate of what would keep the health care systems of all 50 states afloat — no one seems to want to ‘score’ anything these days.  Additionally, Americans should be aware by now that when Republicans chant “Block Grant” they mean “dump it on the states, wash our hands, and walk away” while the states struggle to keep up with demands to meet needs and provide services, operating on budgets which cannot function on deficits.

Then, there’s that perfectly typical Hellerian comment: “If it is improved, I will support it,” leaving the issue entirely up to Senator Heller’s subjective assessment if “it” has improved his re-election chances enough to go along with it while not upsetting his very conservative base.  Meanwhile, the media persists in repeating the “Moderate Heller” mythology, and we haven’t even begun to speak of his actions to thwart and later repeal any common sense regulations on the financial sector.

 

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Filed under conservatism, Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Medicaid, Medicare, Nevada Test Site, Politics, public health, Republicans, Rural Nevada, SCHIP

Heller at the President’s Right: Lunch Time At The White House

Nothing like watching Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) sitting next to POTUS, smiling and applauding as the remarks from the President replicate every standard talking point made by every Republican since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.  Including such wonderful clichés as:

You’ll pay lower premiums (Oh, such lower premiums you won’t believe) — Any fool can sell low premium policies, the ones with high deductibles and co-pays, limited benefits, and caps.  Worse still, these junk policies will be sold across state lines so that consumer standards and protections of the worst level of protection will be the standard.

The states will have control over Medicaid (smaller units will be better for individual needs)  Nothing like blowing a big wide ‘beautiful’ hole in the Nevada budget!  Cutting $770B from Medicaid will have effects far beyond Nevada’s capacity to support its elderly, its children, its rural health care facilities, its support for low income working families.  That was the point of Medicaid — expenses far beyond the capacity of individual states could be shared nationwide, allowing medical care and services for the greatest good for the greatest number.

Some counties only have one insurance corporation offering policies in the individual market.  Did the president recall that before the ACA there were some counties that had no insurance corporations offering policies in the individual market.  There’s a solution to this problem — one the president didn’t mention — establish a public option.

Then there flowed the usual barrel of platitudes and campaign rhetoric, freedom and flexibility, low cost with high coverage,  everyone can get better insurance, reduce burdensome taxation, burdensome regulation….

And there was Senator Dean Heller, smiling as though siding with the president isn’t going to be a major political problem for him in the 2018 campaign season.  It makes a person wonder.

Senator Heller can be reached at 202-224-6244, 775-686-5770; 702-388-6605

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ICYMI: In Case You Missed It, Instant Summer Reading Recommendations

The Nevada Independent has several excellent articles about the health insurance ‘reform’ battle in the state,  I’d recommend starting with ‘Senator Cortez-Masto’s denunciation of the Senate health bill,” and move on to ‘Dispatches from Washington.’

The Reno Gazette Journal reports (video) on Rep. Jacky Rosen’s (D-NV3) decision to run for Senator Dean Heller’s seat.

Please note TPM’s report from the conference of Secretaries of State concerning election data security.  If this conclusion doesn’t disturb us, it should:

“But both Republican and Democratic Secretaries of State, who are responsible for carrying out elections in many states, said they have been frustrated in recent months by a lack of information from federal intelligence officials on allegations of Russian meddling with the vote. They say that despite the best efforts by federal officials, it may be too late in to make substantive changes.”

Interestingly enough, vote suppression advocate Chris Kobach was a no-show at the meeting.  Perhaps this is because some election experts have identified major flaws in Kobach’s “election integrity” plans.

And, now we get to “muddle time” during which the current administration tries to muddy the waters about the  other election problem — Russian interference.  Spokespersons and advocates are on the air-waves saying that “Gee, it’s not 17 intelligence agencies, it’s actually just a handful of people who reached the conclusion that the Russians meddled,”  which is one tactic to discredit the reports that are unequivocal in their assessment that, yes, the Russians interfered.   Following this comes the Gee Whiz moment in which the apologist who says that “we’ve not actually seen the evidence of this.”  A statement such as this is simply a variation on the previous talking point:  We’ve investigated this enough, there’s nothing there, move along please.

Speaking of elections, please take a look at the bill introduced by Rep. Mark Amodei (R-NV2) HR 2101, the Prior Approval Reform Act:  To amend the Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 to expand the ability of trade associations to solicit contributions from the stockholders and executive or administrative personnel of their member corporations, and for other purposes.  The effective date, January 1, 2018, would allow more “corporate” money in politics just in time for 2018 campaign season.   The Associated General Contractors would be pleased to see this enacted. [pdf]  Those disturbed by the dark, and darker money, flowing into our campaigns should track this bill.

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Filed under Amodei, Health Care, health insurance, Heller, Nevada politics, Politics, Vote Suppression, Voting

It Ain’t Over Until The Fat Golfer Sings

Senator McConnell’s Secret Health Insurance Shop is still working, with the Lobbyists/Elves seeking a way to offer goodies acceptable to the wavering and the wanton.  Keep calling!  and if you’d like more information to substantiate your comments there are some excellent sources.

Kaiser Family Foundation:   Your one stop center for research and analysis on health insurance issues.  Definitely a “bookmark this” recommendation.  Today, KFF notes that before the implementation of the ACA individual insurance plans for health care did not cover delivery and maternity care  in 75% of the policies; 45% of the policies didn’t cover substance abuse treatment; and 38% failed to cover any mental health care services.

If terms like “risk adjustment,” “re-insurance,” and “risk corridors” seem like something written in Minoan Linear A, the KFF has an excellent summation of these technical terms in easily understood American English.

There are also some analytical pieces on the impact of Republican suggestions for health care insurance “reform” as they relate to rural health care in the following:

Human Rights Watch — Senate Health Care Bill A Swipe At Rural United States.

MSNBC/Scarborough – Rural Health Care Would Be Savaged By This Bill.

There’s a narrative going around that Democrats haven’t brought anything to the table, which depends on whether we’re taking the long or short term view.  In the short term this would be true — because the McConnell Secret Health Insurance Shop didn’t invite any Democratic participation,  for that matter there seems to have been some Republican Senators who were left in darkness.  The longer view would note some of the following:

Senator Franken’s “Rural Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 2016” (pdf) S. 3191 (114th Congress) was introduced in July 2016 and “died” in the Senate Finance Committee.  The bill would have amended two titles of the Social Security Act to improve health care in rural areas of the United States.

There is Representative Jan Shakowsky’s CHOICE Act, H.R. 635, which would establish a public option under the ACA.  See also S. 194, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse’s CHOICE Act.  There’s Rep. Gene Green’s HR 2628 to stabilize Medicaid and the Children’s Insurance program.  Rep. John Conyers introduced his form of “single payer” in his Medicare for All bill, HR 676.  On the topic of making pharmaceuticals more affordable:  Senator Sanders – Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act S. 469.  Senator Klobuchar has a bill “… to allow for expedited approval of generic prescription drugs and temporary importation of prescription drugs in the case of noncompetitive drug markets and drug shortages.” S. 183. Rep. Kurt Schrader introduced H.R. 749 to increase competition in the pharmaceutical industry.  Senator Ron Wyden introduced S. 1347, RxCap Act of 2017.

Senator Klobuchar has also introduce a bill supporting Alzheimer’s caregivers in S.311.  Rep. Derek Kilmer’s bill, H.R. 1253, seeks to improve access to treatment for mental health and substance abuse issues.   This is by NO means an exhaustive list of what can be gleaned from Gov.Track, but it does illustrate that the Democrats are not without suggestions — negotiating drug prices for Medicare, stabilizing the current system, public options, single payer — it’s just that these bills won’t get out of Republican controlled committees and they didn’t make it into Senator McConnell’s Secret Shop.

Indulge in no victory dance, we’ve seen this movie before … don’t believe that some minor blandishment won’t be enough to lure Senator Heller from his current position …don’t think that the products of McConnell’s Secret Shop have stopped coming off their assembly line.

Senator Heller can be reached at 202-224-6224;  702-388-6605;  775-686-5770

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, nevada health, Pharmaceuticals, Politics, public health

48 Hours: The Health Care Bill

If a person hasn’t found the reason to call Senator Heller’s office and advise him to vote NO on the Republican version of a health care bill, consider the following:

(1)  One in three residents of skilled nursing facilities in Nevada are supported by Medicaid. Now, apply a simple calculator test — if a person was born in 1946 (the beginning of the Baby Boom) he or she will hit 80 in 2026.  In short, the Baby Boomers will be in the age range to need such care just as the major cuts to Medicaid kicks in.  About 65,000,000 children were born in this country between 1945 and 1961.  Cuts to the Medicaid program in this context is essentially create a crisis which we could easily have avoided.

(2) The Republicans are fond of focusing on “premium increases.”  That’s only a part of the story.  Anyone can devise insurance policies with low premiums — raise the deductibles, cut the coverage, increase co-pays,  insert lifetime benefit limits, and Voila! lower premiums.   The problems begin when a person tries to use the insurance — the reason the person bought the policy in the first place — “We’re so sorry, but this policy doesn’t cover immunizations. Or, mammograms, or prostate cancer screening, or the expenses related to the birth of your first child…”

(3) Speaking of lower premiums,  if a person has insurance from an employer then there should be no surprise when the coverage decreases compliments of the waivers included in the Senate bill — “We’re sorry, but we no longer cover wellness screenings for men and women, maternity care, or other elements that used to be included as Essential Benefits.” If a person thought that employer sponsored policies were “safe” from “reforms,” please think again.

(4) This isn’t a health care bill, it’s a tax cut bill.  Those whose income is in the top 0.1% level would receive a lovely $250,000 tax savings gift in 2026. Those earning more than $875,000 (top 1%) would get tax savings of $45,500.  [CNN]  All this at the expense of working Americans.

(5) The buzz word “patient centered” is nonsense.  At bottom, it’s a euphemistic way of saying “You are On Your Own.” A person can “choose” to buy what he or she can afford — and for lower income Americans this means lower coverage and higher out of pocket expenses.  The problem with applying classic market principles to health care is that much of what is covered isn’t a matter of Choice.  No one chooses to be in a traffic accident, any more than a person chooses to get cancer or have a heart attack.   The Republican argument seems to boil down to “live a perfect life and make excellent choices” and you are ‘worthy’ of having insurance.  This argument only works IF a person has no familial risk factors, IF a person isn’t exposed to other people (who might have an infectious disease), and IF a person can afford to build a residence in which there are no places to fall and no way to have an accident with a garage door.  In short, it’s fantasy land.

The next few hours are crucial — that’s right — HOURS. Please call Senator Heller’s office at 702-388-6605;  or 775-686-5770; or 202-224-6244.  Your health care services are at stake.

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Filed under Health Care, health insurance, Heller, nevada health, Nevada politics, Politics

Myths and Legends: The Medicaid Issue in Nevada

There was a Republican politician on my television screen this morning telling me, or trying to tell me, that Medicaid was “meant for mothers, children, and those who couldn’t work…” This is outdated. Then, he tried to convince me that Medicaid was being “abused” by those who work and ‘game the system,’ while spouting platitudes about the Free Market and the Joys of Competition.  Let’s start at the very beginning.

This is the explanation of Medicaid as reported by Nevada’s Division of Health Care Financing and Policy (pdf)

“Medicaid is the nation’s main public health insurance program for people with low incomes and the single largest source of health coverage in the U.S.”

The program is meant to help people with low incomes.

“The PPACA extended coverage to many of the non-elderly uninsured people nationwide. The June 2012 Supreme Court Ruling made Medicaid expansion optional for states, and Nevada elected to join the expansion and maximize federal dollars. Effective January 1, 2014, this move broadened Medicaid eligibility to nearly all adults under age 65 with income at or below 138% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). At the end of SFY 2014 that meant that there were an additional 125,989 new enrollees in Nevada Medicaid, and increased expenditures of $154,816,777.00. These new expenditures are 100% federally funded.” [NV med pdf]

Medicaid expansion added those working Americans who were earning 138% of the poverty line and below, (pdf) and more specifically: (1) Those between the ages of 19 and 64 who are earning less than 138% of the FPL. (2) Pregnant women in homes earning less than 165% of the FPL. (3) Children from birth to 19 years of age in homes wherein the earnings are at or below 205% of the FPL, with a small premium required in some cases. Translated into real people with real levels of low income earned, this means a family of four would be eligible for Medicaid in Nevada if the family earnings are less than $2795 per month; for pregnant women if the earnings are at or less than $3341 per month; and families are eligible for the kids’ Check Up program if family earnings are less than $4151 per month.

If we calculate annual earnings, then monthly earnings of $2795 mean an annual income  of $33,540. At $3341 annual earnings of $40,092, and at $4151 annual income of $41,630. Nevada’s median income is $52,431 (2015). To put these numbers in perspective, the average weekly wages of a person working in a private restaurant in this state are $382, or $1528 per month ($18,336 yearly). [DETR] The average rent for a 2 bedroom apartment in Las Vegas, the obvious site for most private restaurants, is $932 per month. [RJ] In short, not only are wages not all that generous in Nevada, the benefits available for Nevada families aren’t all that generous either.

Republicans, however, strenuously oppose benefits for adults capable of working. This would make infinitely more sense IF and ONLY IF they were willing to support a living wage for all employees. One really doesn’t get to have it both ways.  Either you want a reduction in benefits that most working people can afford to purchase on their own because they have the financial resources to do so, or you want lower wages which mean that individuals and families cannot afford those things, like health insurance, and the public benefits are required to make up the difference.  However, at this point we slam into another GOP myth.

Free market competition will make health insurance affordable for everyone, even those who are working in low wage jobs.  Good luck with that. Personally, I have yet to hear anyone explain with any specificity why health insurance corporations will be flocking to Clark, Washoe, or even Esmeralda counties because there is more “free market” applied to the situation. If the insurance companies weren’t wildly excited about selling individual and family health insurance before the enaction of the ACA, why would they do so now? Unless, of course…

They could sell policies that didn’t cover all that much? That cost more for those between the ages of 50 and 64?  That didn’t cover maternity expenses? That didn’t cover preventative care? That didn’t cover drug rehabilitation and mental health services in parity with physical treatments? That only covered the items required in those states with the least consumer protections? And, even then all we have to look to is the situation in Nevada when insurance corporations were free to offer what they were pleased to call comprehensive policies.  Again, if they weren’t interested in selling a plethora of individual and family policies then why believe they would be now?

And that Free Marketeering? It doesn’t work in the health care industry:

“In a free market, goods and services are allocated through transactions based on mutual consent. No one is forced to buy from a particular supplier. No one is forced to engage in any transaction at all. In a free market, no transactions occur if a price cannot be agreed.

The medical industry exists almost entirely to serve people who have been rendered incapable of representing their own interests in an adversarial transaction. When I need health services I often need them in a way that is quite different from my desire for a good quality television or a fine automobile. As I lie unconscious under a bus, I am in no position to shop for the best provider of ambulance services at the most reasonable price. All personal volition is lost. Whatever happens next, it will not be a market transaction.” [Forbes]

The only thing I can say with any certainty is that the Republicans have little idea exactly what constitutes a Free Market, and instead are waving it like a banner crovering their underlying desire to be free from the moral requirements compelling us to be our brother’s keepers.  The range of misanthropic explications are appalling, from “we need not do anything because the poor will always be with us anyway,” to “when Jesus told us to provide for one another he only meant fellow Christians.”

The Repeal and Replace campaign is as void of humanity as it is of understanding of the reality of most family economics, and of the comprehension of what the term ‘free market’ actually means.

 

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